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Full text of "General catalog : announcements and faculty list ..."

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I8S&/87 




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IOWA 



State Agricultural College. 



1886. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/generalcataloga8687iowa 



Iowa State College 



OF 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC /RTS 



H 



FOR THE YEAR 



1886 



'SCIENCE WITH PRACTICE. 



1886. 

BY THE COLLEGE. 

AMES. 



CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA: 

DAILY REPUBLICAN PRINTING AND BINDING HOUSE. 

1886. 



Calendar for 1887. 



Term opens 

Entrance Examinations - 

Recitations begin 
Term Examination 

Junior Exhibition 
Second Term begins 

Entrance Examinations 

Recitations begin - 
Term Examinations 
Baccalaureate Sermon 
Address before Trustees 
Commencement Exercises 
Winter vacation from November 



Wednesday, February 28. 
Wednesday, February 23. 
Thursday, February, 24. 
Friday, February 25. 
June 16 to 22. 

- Wednesday, June 22. 
Wednesday, July 20. 

f Wednesday, July 20. 
| Thursday, July 21. 
Friday, July 22. 

- November 2 to 9. 
Sunday, November 6. 

- Tuesday evening, Nov. 8. 
Wednesday, November 9. 

10, 1887, to February 22, 1888. 



Board of Trustees. 



First District — Hon. J. \Y. Garner, Columbus City, - 
Second District — Hon. C. M. Dunbar, Maquoketa, 
Third District— Hon. R, P. Speer, Cedar Falls, 
Fourth District — Hon. S. P. Yeomans, Charles City, 
Fifth District — Hon Joseph Dysart, Dysart, 
Sixth District — Hon. John Morrison, Sigourney, - 
Seventh District— Hon. J. S. Clarkson, Des Moines, - 
Eighth District— Hon. C. M. Paschal, New Market, 
Ninth District — Hon. Piatt Wicks, Harlan, 
Tenth District— Hon. 1). W. Mott, Hampton, 
Eleventh District— Hon. A. I). Peck, Sac City, - 



Term Expires. 
189-2 

- 1892 
1890 

- 1892 
1888 

- 189(1 
1888 

- 1S92 
1890 

- 1888 
1888 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

Hon. I). \V. Mott, Hampton, - Chairman. 

E. \Y. Stanton, Ames,- ------ Secretary. 

(Jon. J. L. Geddes, Ames, ----- Treasurer. 

J. R. Lincoln, Amos, ------- Steward. 



MEETINGS. 

The Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees is held on the 
second Wednesday of November; the other meetings are held in 
the latter part of November and in May. 



Officers of Instruction, 



\\ . I. CHAMBERLAIN, A. M., LL. I)., President, 

Professor of Ethics and Lecturer on Practical Agriculture. 

A. S. WELCH, A. M., LI, IX, 
Professor of Psychology and History of Civilization 

S. A. KNAPP, A. M., LL. D., 

Professor of Agriculture and Farm Superintendent. 

W. H. WYNN, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of English Literature, Latin and History. 

M. STALKER, B. Be, V. S., 

Professor of Veterinary Science. 

J. L. BUDD, M. H., 

Professor of Horticulture. 

E. W. STANTON B. Sc., 

Professor of Mathematics and Political Economy. I 

D. S. FAIRCHILD, M. D., 
Profes9or of Pathology, Histology, Therapeutics and Comparative Anatomy. 

C. F. MOUNT, B. C. E.. C. E., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, Capt. 1st Regt. I. N. <{., 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

BYRON D. HALSTET), Sc. D., 

Professor of Botany. 

NORMAN C. BASSETT, B. Sc, 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

* President Leigh Hunt resigned from failing health, and closed his work, and 
President Chamberlain took charge, at the end of the first half year, July 1, 1886.. 



Iowa State College of 



ALFRED A. BENNETT, B. Sc, 

Professor of Chemistry. 

Mrs. EMMA P. EWING, 

Professor <>f Domestic Economy. 

Miss CHARLOTTA H. STOCKMANN, A. M., 

Professor of German am) French. 

HERBERT OSBORN, M. 8c, 

Professor of Zoology and Entomology. 

J. C. HAINER. B. 8c, M. P., 

Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

Miss MARY A. BLOOD, 

Preceptress and Instructor in Elocution and Rhetoric. 

HERMAN KNAPP, B. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Agriculture. 

Mrs. FDA M. RILEY, 

Librarian and Assistant in Mathematics. 

Miss ELIZABETH GOWDY, 

Teacher of Drawing and Painting. 

Miss ANNA 8. GAFF, 
Teacher of Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

FREMONT TURNER, B. M. E, 

Foreman and Teacher in Machine simp. 

\V. B. NILES, I). V. M., 

House Surgeon in Veterinary Department. 

GEO. F. GOODNO, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

NON-RESIDENT LECTURERS. 

L. J. ALLEMAN, M. I)., 

Surgical Therapeutics. 

\\ E. CRUTTENDEN, M. I)., 

Ophthalmology. 



Agriculture am> Mechanic Aims. 



List of Students 



RES! DKNT GRADUATES. 



NAME. 

Goodno, G. F., B. 8c, 
Gray, E., B. C. E., 

Hays, W. M., B. 8. A., 
Hays. Clara .J., B. A., 
Hitchcock, A. S., B. S. A,, 
Lipes, J. C, B. 8c, 
Rawson, Nellie E., B. Ph., 
Schoenleber, F. 8., B. 8. A., Ames. 



Bradford, J. W., 
Burns, P. 8., 
("lough, 8. D., 
Farwell, M. Z., 
Gamble, V. C, 
Gambell, W. E., 
Green , G W., 
Hedges, S. H., 
Hunter, W. B., 
James, J., 
Johnson, A. P., 
Langtitt, Lizzie, 
Langfitt, H. J., 
McCarthy, G. G., 
Mendenhall, M., 
Myers, W. R., 
Reynolds, M. H., 
Rich, O. W., 
Rich man, E. 8., 
8tewart, H. 8., 
Wagner, Cera D., 



POST-OFFICE. 


COUNTY. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Talleyrand, 


Keokuk. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Mt. Ayr, 


Ringgold. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


., Ames. 


Story. 




—Total. 


SENIORS. 




Nashua, 


Chickasaw. 


Maquoketa, 


Jackson. 


( 1 arlisle, 


Warren. 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Winfield, 


Henry. 


Deep River, 


Powesheik. 


Dunlap, 


Harrison. 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Independence, 


Buchanan. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Lancaster, 


Keokuk. 


Big Rock, 


Scott. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Boonesboro, 


Boone. 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Anita, 


( 'ass. 


Shellsburg, 


Benton. 


Winthrop, 


Buchanan. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Runnells, 


Polk. 


Norway, 


Benton. 




—Total 21 



10 



Iowa St 



\TK 



College of 





VETERINARY. 




Buchli, B., B. Sc., 


Alma, 


Kansas. 


Chatterton, H. L., 


Onslow, 


Jones. 


Johnson, ( i. A., 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Johnston, E. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Niles, E. P., 


State Centre, 


Marshall. 


Raven, J. E., 


Carrol], 


( Jarroll. 


Streets, J. J., 


Woodstock, 


Illinois. 

—Total 




JUNIORS. 




Andrews, F. M., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Anderson, C. S , 


Riverside, 


Webster. 


Beach, S. A., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Boyd, F. W., 


Conway, 


Taylor. 


Canady, C. M., 


Zenorsville, 


Boone. 


Casey, Emma I., 


What Cheer, 


Keokuk. 


( Jhristie, E. J., 


Vinton, 


Benton. 


Clark, S. 11., 


Ames. 


Story. 


Coe, W. S., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Coe, P. W., 


( Jlarence, 


Cedar. 


( Jolton, G. H., 


Waverly, 


Bremer. 


Cotey, C J., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Crawford, Esther, 


Missouri Valley, 


Harrison. 


( 'urtiss, O. F., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Faville, F., 


( )sa^e, 


Mitchell. 


Felt, A. <\, 


Blairstown, 


Denton. 


Flora, ( l., 


Rhodes, 


Marshall. 


Frater, W. 11., 


Clarence, 


( ledar. 


( lovier, (J. S., 


Mt. Pleasant, 


Henry. 


Harpel, L. V., 


Sheldahl, 


Polk." 


1 [arisen, X. E , 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


K irkpal rick, E. A., 


Rhodes, 


Marshall. 


Malley, F. W., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


McCarty, 0. E., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Miller, E. M , 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Osborn, A. !<;., 


Laporte ( !ity, 


Blackhawk. 


Paxton, J., 


Beloit, 


Lyon. 


Perley, J. A., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Preston, II. L., 


Dunlap, 


1 larrison. 



Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 



1 l 



Randall, G. R., 
Schermerhorn, G. L 
Spencer, C. L., 

si in-oii, F. E , 
Sturtz, (J w.. 
Wilson, OUie M., 



Barnes, (J.Z.. 
Bennett, R. C, 
Besser, E., 
Ferguson, C, 
Ceddes, T. A., 
Graves, F. H., 
Hoskins, F. W. 
Igo, W. S. 
Nelson, S., 
Patty, L. G., 
Thurtle, R. P., 
Tillie, J., 
Wilson, .J. W., 



Warren, 

Jefferson, 

Cleveland, 

Rhodes, 

Boone, 

Harper, 



VETERINARY. 

State Centre, 

Des Moines, 

Harper, 

Sigourney, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

Sioux Rapids, 

Palmyra, 

Avoca, 

Carroll, 

Des Moines, 

Spirit Lake, 

Traer, 



Illinois. 
Greene. 

Ohio. 

Marshall. 

Boone. 

Keokuk. 

—Total 35. 

Marshall. 

Polk. 

Keokuk. 

Keokuk. 

Story. 

Story. 

Buena Vista. 

Warren . 

Pottawattamie. 

Carroll. 

Polk. 

Dickinson. 

Tama. 

—Total 18. 



Abraham, J. G., 
Allen, J. B., 
Baker, C, 

Bartholomew, Ethel, 
Bartholomew, C. L., 
Bradford, S., 
Brand vig, A., 
Branson, L. C, 
Cadwallader, M. W., 
Carr, F., 
Corbett, H. R., 
Cox, Edith B., 
Culver, J. M., 
Davidson, J. G., 
Dobbin, F. L., 



SOPHOMORES. 

Mt. Pleasant, 

Council Bluffs 

Centre ville, 

Chariton, 

Chariton, 

Ames, 

Story City, 

Villisca, 

Janes vi lie, 

Des Moines, 

Nelson, 

La Moille, 

Glidden, 

Monticello, 

State ( Jentre, 



Henry. 

Pottawattamie. 
Appanoose. 
Lucas. 
Lucas. 
Story. 
Story. 

Montgomery. 
Bremer. 
Polk. 

Nebraska. 
Marshall. 
Carroll. 
Jones. 
Marshall. 



12 



Iowa State College of 



Durkee, J. E., 
Ericson, E. L., 
Fatland, O., 
Fellows, Mary E., 
Ferguson, .J. L., 
Pinnigau, CA, 
Frater, Grace I., 
George, Juno L., 
Gladson, W. N., 
(J ranger, H. K., 
Gyde, .J. E., 
Henderson, Ella L., 
Hunt, C. W., 
Lightner, F., 
Lough ran, S. L., 
McCuskey, Lizzie, 
Meissner, (J. L., 
Miller, R., 
Morris, T. B., 
Moulton, Laura P., 
Peterson, \Y., 
Potter, C. H., 
Pritchard, Statio, 
Sanborn, .J. S.. 
Schoenleber, J., 
Sheafe, E. A., 
Shelden, B. .J., 
Skinner, E. P>., 
Spencer, N., 
Stanley, F. L., 
Tallman, 0. E., 
Techentin, IF \V., 
Thompson, VV. L., 
Tilden, L. C, 
Wagner, Stella E., 
Wallace, II. C, 
Warwick, \V. F , 
Wal m US, Marion I ., 

Waug ii, Nannie E., 
Weatherby, Florence I" 
Wentch, Julia A , 
Wilson. J. F., 



Charles City, 

Story City, 

Cambridge, 

Montour, 

Carson, 

Montezuma, 

Clarence, 

Iowa Falls, 

Corning, 

Ames, 

Tipton, 
Monticello, 
Logan, 

Chester Centre, 
Ames, 

Defiance, 
Webster City, 
Ames, 

Brooks, 

Ames, 

Harcourt, 

La Motte, 

Calliope, 

Mason City, 

Lyman, 

Ottumwa, 

Ames, 

Orchard, 

Alden, 

Holt, 

Keota, 

Davenport, 

Madrid, 

Ames, 

Norway, 

Winterset, 

Holt, 

I )es Moines, 

Manchester, 

Defiance, 

Traer, 

( iambridge, 



Floyd. 
Story. 
Story. 
Tama. 

Pottawattamie. 
Poweshiek. 
Cedar. 
Hardin. 
Adams. 
Story. 
Cedar. 
Jones. 
Harrison. 
Poweshiek. 
Story. 
Shelby. 
Hamilton. 
Story. 
Adams. 
Story. 
Webster. 
Jackson. 
Sioux. 

Cerro Gordo. 
( 'ass. 
Wapello. 
Story. 
Mitchell. 
Hardin. 
Taylor. 
Keokuk. 
Scott. 
Polk. 
Story. 
Benton. 
Madison. 
Taylor. 

Polk. 
Deleware. 
Shelby. 
Tama. 

Story. 



Agriculture and Mechanic Aims. 



13 



Wright, W. H., 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Wright, Lula B., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wormley, T. .)., 


N"ewton, 


.Jasper. 


Yates, S., 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 

—Total 61. 



Armstrong, F. W., 
Armstrong, J. W., 
Ash worth, C. A>, 
Ashley, T. E., 
Baker, ,J. A., 
Banks, J. E., 
Barnes, D. C, 
Brady, H. L., 
Baldwin, C. E., 
Bartlett, Alary E., 
Bingham, Lizzie A., 
Bingham, L. L., 
Brand vig, M., 
Kisl.ee, D. B., 
Bennett, I. B., 
Broadhead, May, 
Banister, Nettie, 
Budrow, W. B., 
Boyd, W. K., 
Cameron, Maggie E., 
Christie, Inez, 
Clark, R. F., 
Cobb, E. M., 
Coggeshall, G. W., 
Cook, F. F., 
Cooley, F., 
Cowgill, C, 
Cutler, O. I., 
Dennis, E. (»., 
Dodd, F. B., 
Durham, C. H., 
Ferman, F. W., 



FRE8HMEN. 

Mt. Vernon, 

Cedar Rapids, 

Ashua, 

Bed Oak, 

Rhodes, 

Knoxville, 

Ottawa, 

Perry, 

Nashua, 

Audubon, 

Swan Lake, 

Swan Lake, 

Story City, 

Ames, 

Mt. Ayr, 

Hedriek, 

Cherokee, 

Ogden, 

Tipton, 

Hillsboro, 

Vinton, 

Independence, 

Ames, 

Des Moines, 

Osceola, 

Truro, 

Harcourt, 

Belmont, 

Holt, 

Waucoma, 

Independence, 

Blairstown. 



Lynn. 
Lynn. 
Polk. 

Montgomery. 

Marshall. 

Marion. 

Illinois. 

Dallas. 

Chickasaw. 

Audubon. 

E nil net. 

Emmet. 

Story. 

Story. 

Ringgold. 

Keokuk 

Cherokee. ' 

Boone. 

Cedar. 

Dakota. 

Benton. 

Buchanan. 

Story. 

Polk. 

Clarke. 

Madison. 

Webster. 

Wright, 

Taylor. 

Fayette. 

Buchanan. 

Benton. 



14 



Iowa State College of 



Fitch, Julia, 
Fuller, Q. C, 
Gaston, Jessie E., 
Godfrey, W. S., 
( roldner, F. L, 
Gose, E. !'>.. 
( rose, E. S., 
Gossard, H. A., 
( rraham, A. L., 
( rreen, B. T., 
Haatvedt, O. E., 
Halsted, E. C, 
1 [asbrouck, .1., 
Hensen, W. R, 
1 [erman, .1. F., 
Romans, .1. E., 
Hulse, L. E., 
Jackson, Lou, 
Johnson, ( i. A., 
Kelsey, J. A., 
Kerr, T. S„ 
Kimball, C. F., 
Kneedy, C. M., 
Lamborn, C. W., 
Lough ran, 1). L., 
Lucas, Mabel F., 
Lynn, W. E., 
Lynn, Frances M., 
Madden, L. E., 
Mahoney, J. 1L, 
McPherson, A., 
McBirney, J., 
McClelland, a., 
Mc< 'lure, ( rertrude, 
McLaughlin, A. A., 

McNeil, F. J., 

Meissner, J. A., 
Morris, S. \\ ., 
Newell, Belle, 
Nichols, I A., 
Pain*, K. L., 
Peabody, I . S. ( ;., 



Sac City, 
Swan Lake, 
Ames, 
Des Moines, 
Keota, 

Pleasantville, 
Pleasant ville, 
Ames, 
Atlantic, 
Little Rock, 
Ft. Dodge, 
Glidden, 
Humeston, 
Den i son, 
Boone, , 
Fairfax, 
Keota, 
Dunlap, 
Des Moines, 
Dunlap, 
Cincinnati, 
Anamosa, 
Red Oak, 
Elliott, 
Des Moines, 
Des Moines, 
State ( lentre, 
Meriden, 
Boone, 
Boone, 
Oel wein, 
Conrad Grove, 
Dos Moines, 
Knoxville, 
Webster ( !ity, 
< iicene, 
Reinbeck, 
Brooks, 
Woodward, 
Glidden, 
Bon Durant, 
Burlington, 



Sac. 
Emmet. 

Story. 
Polk. 
Keokuk. 
Marion. 
Marion. 
Story. 
( "ass. 
Lyon. 
Webster. 
Carroll. 
Wayne. 
( 'raw ford. 
Boone. 
Lynn. 
Keokuk. 
Harrison. 
Polk. 
Harrison. 
Appanoose. 
Jones. 

Montgomery. 
Montgomery, 
Polk. 
Polk. 
Marshall. 
Cherokee. 
Boone. 
Boone. 
Fayette. 
( Jrundy. 
Polk. 
Marion. 
Hamilton. 
Butler. 
( rruudy. 
Adams. 
Dallas. 
Carroll. 
Polk. 
I )es Moines. 



Agriculture and Mechanic A.rts. 



15 



Phillips, .). F., 
Polk, C. M., 
Richard, W. IT., 
Richardson, A. B., 
Rolls, H., 
Ross, Mary A., 
Ruggles, F. F., 
Sallie, Lillie G., 
Sampey, G. A., 
Schaal, Frederica C, 
Schaal, Lizzie, 
Schipfer, (). A.. 
Schoemaker, W., 
Scott, Ellen S., 
Scott, VV. W., 
Shelton, .1. A., 
Sirrine, F. A., 
Starr, P. W., 
Stearns, C. H., 
Stroud, J. S., 
Suit, H., 

Thompson, Lettie C , 
Thornburg, M. W., 
Tburleman, Rosalia, 
Tuthill, J. S., 
Wade, Libbie E., 
Wheaton, G. R., 
Whited, Myra, 
Zimbleman, Mary, 



Des Moines, 

Grinnell, 

Hunabolt, 

Dexter, 

LeClaire, 

Exira, 

(Hidden, 

Cainsville, 

Newton, 

Polk City, 

Polk City, 

Sigourney, 

Muscatine, 

Daw City, 

Sheldahl, 

Abingdon, 

Dysart, 

Carson, 

Ames, 

Linden, 

Selma, 

Agency, 

Stewart, 

Carroll, 

Tipton, 

Stanwood, 

Grinnell, 

Alden, 

Boonesboro. 



Polk. 

Poweshiek. 
Hunibolt. 
Dallas. 
Scott. 
Audubon. 
Carroll. 
Missouri. 
Jasper. 
Polk. 
Polk. 
Keokuk. 
Muscatine. 
Crawford. 
Story. 
Jefferson. 
Tama. 

Pottawattamie. 
Story. 
Dallas. 
Van Buren. 
Wapello. 
Guthrie. 
Carroll. 
Cedar. 
Cedar. 
Powesbiek. 
Hardin. 
Boone. 

—Total 103. 



Bard well, F. A., 
Brown, Lillie, 
Butler, Hattie X., 
Gary, C. A., B. Sc, 
Craig, J., 
Gilbert, Amy E., 
Gilbert, Mary R., 
Heliker, Inez, 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Ft. Dodge, Webster. 

Ames. Story. 

Jamestown, New York. 

Millersburg, Iowa. 

Abbotsford, Canada. 

State Centre, Marshall. 

State Centre, Marshall. 

Jefferson, Greene. 



Id 



Iowa State College of 



Mann, Clara, 
Milligan, Cora, 
Morrison, Mina, 
Mott, Lincolnebte, 
Robinson, Viola C, 
Rath, S., 

Sherwood, W. B., 
stout, Etta J., 
Thomas, Allie, 
Wilburn, A., 
Wilkinson, Lydia A., 



Oakland, 
Jefferson, 
Sigourney, 
Hampton, 
Ottumwa, 
Aekley, 

Strawberry Point, 
[ndependence, 
Ames, 
Des Moines, 
Ames, 



Pottawattamie. 
( Jreene. 
Keokuk. 
Franklin. 
Wapello. 
Hardin. 
Clayton. 
Buchanan. 
Story. 
Polk. 
Story. 

—Total 19. 



Sl'H-KHKSHMKN. 



Aldrich, H., 
Anderson, p. P., 
Bower, Josie, 
Bradley, A. P., 
Beyer,S. W., 
Bramhall, J. A., 
Buffington, G. P 
Creed, A. W., 
Day, IP IP, 
Forest, P., 
< J raves, IP I)., 
( Ireeley, P. S. , 
Harpel, Emma P 
Hogau, T., 
Heileman, W. I P 
Heniing, W. S., 
Holiday, .1. VV., 
Jacobs, IP, 
Johnson, Lou, 
Johnson, Nellie, 
Jones. Lizzie B., 

K needy, P P., 

Morris, VV. W., 
Rapp, V., 
Rowe, I-:. E , 
J. J., 



Tipton, 

< rreene, 

Glidden, 

Ames, 

Manly, 

Carlisle, 

Salem, 

Algona, 

Des Moines, 

Miles, 

Madrid, 

Waterman, 

Sheldahl, 

Iowa City, 

PI well, 

( !edar Rapids 

Burlington, 

Forest ( !ity, 

Alton, 

Alton, 

( Iherokee, 

Ped o :1 k, 

Bentonsport, 

Osage, 

I rtica, 

Ananiosa, 



Cedar. 
Floyd. 
Carroll. 
Story. 
Worth. 
Warren. 
Henry. 
Kossuth. 
Polk. 
Jackson. 
Boone. 
Illinois. 
Polk. 
.Johnson. 
Story. 
Lynn. 
Des Moines. 
Winnebago. 
Sioux. 
Sionx. 
( "herokee. 
Montgomery. 
Van Buren. 
Mitchell. 
Van Buren. 
Jones. 



Ac 



RICl'LTUKE AN 



i> Mechanic A bts 



17 



Sehultz, Knmia, 


Alden, 


Hardin. 


Shaffer, 1). C., 


Ashua, 


Polk. 


Sheltbn, Sadie E., 


Griswold, 


Cass. 


Snyder, \\, 


Dixon, 


Scott. 


Sterrett, D. C, 


Morning Sun, 


Louisa. 


Tjernagel, N., 


Randall, 


Hamilton. 


Troeger, K. 


National, 


Clayton. 


Wade, C, 


Stanwood, 


Cedar. 


Warren, L. H., 


Dunlap, 


Harrison. 


Warren, J. E., 


Cambridge, 


Story. 


Watrous, P., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Wheeler, H. P., 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 

—Total 38, 



SUMMARY. 



Resident Graduate! 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Special Students 

Sub-Freshmen 



8 
28 
48 
61 
103 
19 
38 



Total enrollment- 



305 



18 



Iowa State College of 



dst of Graduates, 



1872. 



NAME. 

J. C. Arthur, B. So., M. Sc. 
P. S. Brown, B. Sc, 
(). H. Cessna, B. Sc, 
*S. A. Churchill, B. Sc, 
*S. H. Dickey, B. Sc, 
Charles Deitz, B. Sc, 
L. Foster, B. Sc, 
H. Fuller, B. Sc, 
F. I,. Harvey, B. Sc, 

*F. M. Hungerford, B. Sc, 
Mattie E. [Locke] Macomber, 

Sc., 
.1. K Macomber, B. Sc, 
L. W. Xoyes, B. Sc, 
II. I,. Page, 1 >». Sc, 
<;. W. Ramsey, B. Sc, M. I)., 
Fannie H. [Richards] Si; 

ley, B. Sc, 
('. A. Smith, B. Sc, 

I. \Y. Smith, B. Sc, 

II. C. Spencer, B. Sc., 
E. W. Stanton, B. Sc, 
J. L. Stevens, B. Sc, 
c. L. Suksdorf, B. Sc, 

T. L. Thompson, B. Sc, 
C. II. Tillolson, 15. Sc, 

C. I'. W'ellman, B. Sc 
.1. M. Wells, B. Sc, 



B 



POST-OFFICE. 


STATE. 


Geneva, 


New York 


Northville, 


Dakota. 


Chicago, 


Illinois. 


Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


Brooking, 


Dakota. 


Ottuniwa, 


Iowa. 


Philadelphia, 


Penn. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


( Jhicago, 


Illinois. 


Boone, 


Iowa. 


Magnolia, 


Illinois. 



Charles City, 


Iowa. 




Grinnell, 


Iowa. 




Ames, 


Iowa. 




Ames, 


Iowa. 




Mt. Adams, 


Wash 


ton T 


Ames, 


Iowa. 




Nevada, 


Iowa. 





Total 2(>. 



'Deceased 



Agriculture and Mechank Arts.. 



10 



1873. 

E. L. Beard, B. Sc., Frankville, 
Rowena F, [Edson] Stevens, B. 

Sc, Ames, 
*G. R. Flower, B. Sc 

W.Green, B. Sc, Davenport, 
G. W. Harvey, B. Sc, Ph, C, 

M. D., 

A. M. Hawkins, B. Sc, Ellensbnrg, 

I). A. Kent, B. Sc, Des Moines, 

Kate [Krater] Star, B. Sc, Algona, 

.1. S. Lee, B. Sc, Des Moines, 

C. B. Maben, B. Sc, Minneapolis, 

M. F. Marshall, B. Sc, Knoxville, 

11 at tie E. [Raybourne] Morse, 

B. Sc Littleton, 

\Y. (). Robinson, B. Se., Bloomington, 

M. Stalker, B. Se,, V. S., Ames, 

Sallie [Stalker] Smith, B. Sc, Charles City, 



1874. 



Estella J. Bebout, B. Sc, 
C. D. Boardman, B. Sc, M. D., 
C. S. Chase, B. Sc, 
C. E. Clingan, B. Sc, M. D., 
E. R. Clingan, B. Sc, LL. B., 
C. P. Hastings, B. Sc, 
J. G. W. Kiesel, B. S. C, 
M. C. Litteer, B. Sc, 
G. E. Marsh, B. Sc, 
O. P. McCray, B. Sc, 
Mary A. [Palmer] Snell, B. Sc 
A. A. Parsons, B. Sc, 
Eva E. [Paull] Vanslyke, B. Sc 
E. A. Pyne, B. Sc, 
Ida E. [Smith] Noyes, B. Sc, 
W. R. Smith, B. Sc, 
Kate N. Tnpper, B. Sc, 
J. R. Whittaker, B. Sc, LL. B. 
*S. Y. Yates, B. Sc 



Des Moines, 
Odeboldt, 
Waterloo, 
Sioux City, 
Fort Benton, 
San Francisco, 
Dubuque, 

Cresco, 
Sioux City, 
, Boonsboro, 

, Dnbuqne, 

Vinton, 

Chicago, 

Chicago, 

Appleton, 
. Boone, 



Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Dakota. 

Wash' ton T. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Minnesota. 

Iowa. 

Colorado. 
Nebraska. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 

—Total 15. 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Montana. 
California. 
Iowa. 
Missouri. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 

New York. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Illinois. 
Illinois. 
Wisconsin. 
Iowa. 

—Total 19. 



Iowa State College oi 



20 



1875. 



K. P. Caldwell, B. Sc., LL. B., 
Millah M. [Cherrie] Whiting, 

B. Sc., 
Alice [Cunningham] Culver, 

B. Sc, 
Lizzie M. [Curtis] Foster, B. Sc , 
R. P. Kelley, P>. Sc, LL. B., 
C. H. Lee, B. Sc, 
W. I\. Lanioreaux, B. Sc. 
Hannah P. [Lyman] Caldwell, 

B. Sc, 
F. J. Macomber, P. Sc, LL. B., 
Oelestia A. [Neal] Gerhart, 

B. Sc., 
T. L. Palmer, B. Sc, 
H. R. Patrick, P>. Sc, 
C. E. Peterson, B. Sc, 
IdaM. [Ross] Board man, B. Sc, 
M. E. Rudolph, B. Sc, LL. P>., 
[da L. [Sherman] Calkins, B. Sc, 
L. C. Thornton, B. Sc, 
J. M. Whittaker, B. Sc, LL. P,., 
Nancy Wills, P>. Sc, 
Lizzie M. [Wilson] Edwards, 

B. Sc, 



Astoria, 


Oregon. 


Des Moines, 


iowa. 


Knoxville, 


Iowa. 


Brooking, 


Dakota. 




Kansas. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Ft. Dodge, 


Iowa. 


Astoria, 


Oregon. 


Lewis, 


Iowa. 


Astoria, 


Oregon. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 




Arizona. 




Iowa. 


Odeboldt, 


Iowa. 


Canton, 


Dakota. 


Nashua, 


Iowa. 


Kansas City, 


Missouri. 


Marshalltown, 


Iowa. 


Boone, 


Iowa. 


Waterloo, 


Iowa. 




—Total 20 



1876. 



M. 1. Aitkin, P. Sc, 


Cincinnati, 


Ohio. 


A. P. Parker, B. Sc. 


Clinton, 


Iowa. 


P. M. Beard, P. Sc, 


Decorah, 


Iowa. 


A. M. Blodgett, P. sc, 


Kansas < Jity, 


Missouri. 


Julia c. [ Blodgetl | Hainer,B.Sc 


, Aurora, 


Nebraska 


P. A. Claussen, P. Sc, M. I)., 


Beatrice, 


Nebraska. 


.1. E. Oobbey, P. Sc, LL. P., 


Peat rice, 


Nebraska 


\V. S Cull ii'is, P. Sc, 


Springfield, 


Iowa. 


WiiinilVcl M. | Dudley | Shaw, 






B. Sc, 


( 'orning, 


Iowa. 


J.J. Fegtly, P». Sc, 


Keosauqua, 


Iowa. 



Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 



21 



G. A. Garard, B. Sc. LI,. P>.. 

\V. F. Gilmore, P». 8c, 

J. P. Hardin, B. Sc, LL. B., 

Ellen W. Harlow, B. Sc, 

A. I-:. Hitchcock, B. Sc , 

\V. M. James. B. Sc, 

Ella F. [Mead] Dissmore, R. S 

II. M.Scott, B. Sc, 

A. B. Shaw, B. Sc, 

L. B. Spencer, B. Sc, LL. B., 

\V. M. Woodward, B. So. 



I vin^s ley, 


Iowa. 


Tipton, 


Iowa. 


Eldora 


Iowa. 


Astoria, 


Oregon. 


Mitchell, 


Dakota, 


ElPaso, 


Texas, 


Devil's Lake, 


Dakota. 


Ma pie ton, 


Iowa. 


Corning, 


Iowa. 


Grinnell, 


Iowa. 




—Total 21 



1877. 



F. W. Booth, B. Sc, 
Alfaretta J. Campbell, B. Sc, 
Mary C. [Carpenter] Hardin, 

B. Sc, 
('. C. Colclo, B. Sc, 
Kate S. [Curtis] Myrick, B. Sc, 
J. \V. Doxsee, B. Sc, 
Mary E. [Farwell] Carpenter, 

B. Sc, 
A. P. Ha ru rave, B. Sc, 
\V. A. Hellsell, B. Sc, LL. B., 
J. R. Hungerford, B. Sc, 
W. N". Hunt, B. Sc, 
R. F.Jordan, B. Sc, LL. B., 
•Cora B. [Keith] Pierce. B.Sc 

E. L. King, B. Sc, 
C. I. Miller, B.Sc, 

Alice [Neal] Gregg, B. Sc, 
J. C Milnes, B. Sc, V. S., 
Cora M. [Patty] Payne, B. Sc, 
L. B. Robinson, P>. Sc, 
T. L. Smith. B. Sc, 

F. L. Stratton, B. Sc, 

H. M. White, B. Sc, LL. P., 



Philadelphia, 


Penn. 


Cedar Rapids, 


Iowa, 


Eldora, 


Iowa, 


Carroll City, 


Iowa, 


Monti cello, 


Iowa, 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 


Columbos, 


Iowa. 


Odeboldt. 


Iowa, 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 


Cheyenne, 


Wy. Ter. 


Boone, 


Iowa. 


Osceola, 


Iowa. 


Boone, 


Iowa. 


Traer, 


Iowa, 


Cedar Rapids, 


Iowa. 


Linden, 


Iowa, 


Oakland, 


Iowa. 


Wassau, 


Wisconsin. 


Gifford, 


Iowa. 


Washington, 


California. 



Total 22. 



0.9 



Iowa State College of 



1878. 



Florence [Brown] Martin, 



B. S3, 


Astoria, 


Oregon. 


R. Burke, B. Sc, 


What Cheer, 


Iowa. 


A. E. Griffith, B. Sc,, M. Ph., 


Fontanelle, 


Iowa. 


H. L. Glenn, B Sc, 


Livingston, 


Montana. 


J. C. Hainer, B. Sc, M. D., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


M M. Hitchcock, B. C. E., 


Mitchell, 


Dakota. 


C. B. Martin, B. C E., 


Astoria, 


Oregon. 


J. 0. Meredith, B. M. E., 


Kansas City, 


Missouri. 


Emma [MoHeury] Glenn, B. 






Sc, ' 


Livingston, 


Montana. 


T). McKinnon, B. Sc,, 


Aurelia, 


Iowa. 


J. X. Muncey, B. Sc , 


Jesup, 


Iowa. 


C. F. Mount! B. C, E., C, E., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Ellen [Rice] Bobbins, B. Sc, 


Manchester, 


N. Hampshire, 


W. K. Bobbins, B. Sc, M. Sc 


, Manchester, 


N. Hampshire 


Lucy [Sheperd] Beckwith, B. 






Sc, 


Lompoc, 


California. 


Ida Twitchell, B. Sc, 


Santa Marie, 


California. 


E. (;. Tyler, B. C. E , 


Logan, 


Iowa. 


T. F. Lee, IS. S., 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


G. W. Wilson, 1?. C. E., 






J. W. Whitney, B. Sc, 


Prairieb urg, 


Iowa. 


Belle Woods, B. Sc, 


Golden, 
1879. 


Colorado. 

-Total 21. 


Matilda [Cleaver] Faville, B. 






Sc, 


Fort Collins, 


Colorado. 


S. ( Jarrie | ( larter] I [anson, 






B. Sc, 






Lillie M. Croy, B. Sc, 


Ontario, 


Iowa. 


<;. c. Favillej B. Sc , 1). V. M. 


, Fort ( !ollins, 


Colorado. 


1'. \. Field, B. C. E., 


Burlington, 


Iowa. 


F. II. Friend, r>. C. E., 


Albion, 


Nebraska. 


\ L. Hanson, B. 0. E., 


1 1 illsboro, 


1 )akota. 


T. \'. Hoggatt, B Sc, 


Ree Hights, 


Dakota. 


J, E. Hyde, B. Sc, 


1 1 Illsboro, 


Dakota. 


L. 1- Man warring, B. Sc, 






LI, B., 


Stillwater, 


Minnesota. 



A.GRIC1 LTURE AND MECHANIC AkTS. 



23 



W. <;. McConnon, P>. M. E. 
.Jennie [McElyea] livers, B. S 

.). C. Noble, B. Sc , 
11. Osborn, r> Sc, M. Sc. 
.1. D. Shearer, B. Sc, 
F. Turner, B. M. E., 
W. M. Scott, B. Sc, 
.1. M Waugh, B. Sc., 

■Genevieve [Welch] Barstow 
B. Sc, 
W. Whited, B. M. E., M. E 
Alice [Whitedl Burling, B. Sc 



New York, 


New York. 


■V., Sioux Rapids, 


Towa. 


Ames. 


Iowa. 


Minneapolis, 


Minnesota. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Larimore, 


Dakota. 


Bellville, 
w, 


Illinois. 


Montreal, 


Canada. 


ic, Eldora, 


Iowa. 




—Total 21 



1880. 



M. .1. Bailey, B. Sc, 
I). 1). Briggs, B. Sc, 

*F. Boddy, B. Sc, 
(). S. Brown, B. Sc. 
M. H. Hakes, 
J. Hassett, B. Sc, 
E. I). Harvey, B. Sc, 
1). S. Hardin, B. Sc, 
Carrie C. [Lane] Chapman, B. 

Sc, 
C. H. McGrew, B. Sc, M. Ph., 
R. M. Nicholson, B. Sc, D. V. 

M., 
G. E. Reed, B. Sc, 
J. L. Simcoke, 15. Sc, 
C. D. Taylor, B. Sc, 
W. A. Thomas, B. V. M., 
.1. Vincent, Jr., B. V. M , 
W. B. Welch, B. Sc, 



Rushville, 


Nebraska. 


Edenville, 


Iowa. 


Martelle, 


Iowa. 


Leadville, 


Colorado. 


Humboldt, 


Iowa, 


Beatrice, 


Nebraska. 


Mason City, 


Iowa. 


Sigourney, 


Iowa. 


Oskaloosa, 


Towa. 


Vinton, 


Iowa. 


Redfleld, 


Iowa. 


West Liberty, 


Iowa. 


Lincoln 


Nebraska, 


Shenandoah, 


Iowa. 


Salina, 


Kansas. 




—Total 1 



1881. 



Win. C. Armstrong, B. C. E., 
Nellie M. Bell, B. Sc, 



Chanute, Kansas. 

Missouri Valley, Iowa, 



24 



Iowa State College of 



A. M. Beresford, B. So., 
Thomas Burke, B. Sc., 
Marilla J. Grossman, B. Sc, 
Chas. M. Coe, B. Sc, 
F. B. Colby, B. C. E , 
.las. S. Dewell, B. Sc, 
C. A. Dodge, B. C. E„ 

E. C. Fortner, B. Sc, M. D., 

F. E. Furry, B. Sc. 
M. J. Furry, B. Sc, 
Julia A. Hanford, B. Sc, 
R.J. Hopkins, B. Sc, 

J. R. McGavren, B. Sc, 
W. H. McHenry, P>. Sc, 
W. O. Me K hoy, P>. C. E., 
Fannie J. [Perrett] Gait, P>. 

Sc, 
Alice [Sayles] Osborn, B. Sc, 
T. W. Shearer, B Sc, M. I)., 



Vinton, 


Iowa. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Falls Church, 


Virginia. 


Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


Ores ton, 


Iowa. 


Missouri Valley, 


Iowa. 


Orange City, 


Iowa. 


Summer, 


Iowa. 


Alden, 


Iowa. 


Alden, 


Iowa. 


La Porte City, 


Iowa. 


Boone, 


Iowa. 


Missouri Valley, 


Iowa. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Newton, 


Iowa, 


Pueblo, 


Colorado. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 




—Total 20. 



1882. 



\V. I). Atkinson, li. Sc, 
*J. A. Blaine, 15. Sc, 
Etta M. Budd, B. Sc, 
G. \Y. ('ad, B. C. E., 
Mary II. [Coe] Lorbeer, B, Sc. 
W. Y. A. Dodds, B. Sc, 
W. M. Dudley, F>. Sc, 
II .1. Gabel, B. Sc, 
C. I. Lorbeer, 15. Sc, 

.1. B. Marsh, B. M. E., 
E. A. McDonald, B. Sc, 
.1. I!. MeKim li. Sc, 
Nellie B. | Merrill] Wheeler, 

r». 8c, 
Delia Neal, B. Be, 
.1. II. Patton, B. Sc, 
Kattie a. Perrett, B. Be, 
Lizzie Perritt, B. Sc, 
O. C. Peterson, B. 8c, LL. B., 



Parsons, 



Kansas. 



Ames, 


Iowa. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Pomona, 


California. 


Devil's Lake, 


Dakota. 


Mapleton, 


Iowa. 


Arcadia, 


Iowa. 


Pomona, 


California. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Oxford, 


Nebraska. 


Pickrell, 


Nebraska. 


Alcona, 


Iowa'. 


Lawrence, 


Kansas. 


Big Rock, 


Iowa. 


Mason City, 


Iowa. 


Rock Falls, 


Iowa. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 



Aorigi i.i'i re and Mechanic Arts. 



25 



Kitty E. Reeves, B. Sc., 
C. P. Savior, B. Sc, 


Waverly, 
Des Moines, 


Iowa. 
Iowa. 


Surah E. [Smith] McDonald, 
B. Sc, 


Oxford, 


Nebraska. 


I). T. Stockman, B. Sc, 


Richland, 


Iowa. 


\V. S. Summers, B. Sc., LL 15., 


Beatrice. 


Nebraska 


W. \V. Wheeler, B. Sc, 

W. 1 . White, B. Sc, 


Algona, 
Pressington, 


Iowa 
Dakota. 

—Total 25. 



1883. 



A. M. Allen, B. Sc, 

A. (i. Andrews. B. C. E., 
G. M. Burnham, B. Sc, 
Bertie N, Carson, B. Sc, 
( teorge Caven, B. C. E., 
Jennie L. Christman, B. Sc, 
Jennie Colclo, B. Sc, 
George W. Curtis, B. S. A. 
C. M. Doxsee, B. Sc, 

*Lottie Estes, B. Sc, 
C. H. Flynn, I). V.M., 
Jessie E. Prater, B. Sc, 

B. M. Hunter, B. Sc, 
C.H. Keigly, B. S. A., 
Minnie Knapp, B. Sc, 
Herman Knapp, B. S. A., 
Mary W. [McDonald] Knapp, 

B. Sc, 
Kate [McNeil] Wells, B. Sc, 
A. M. Miller, B.Sc, 
E. Mead, B. Sc., C. E., 
Emily A. Reeve, B. Sc, 
M. J. Briggs, B. C. E., 
S. C. Scott, B. Sc, 

Ktliic (J. Slater, B. Sc, 
P. J. Smith, B. Sc, 
M. E. Wells, B. Sc, 
\\. D. Wells, B.Sc, 
Agatha M. West, B. Sc. 
Mabel A. [Young] Alexander, 
B. Sc, 



Minneapolis, Minnesota, 

Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

A Idem Iowa. 



Minneapolis, 


Minnesota. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 


College Station . 


Texas. 


Algona, 


Iowa. 


Decorah, 


Iowa. 


Los Angeles, 


California. 


Sac City, 


Iow T a. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Lake Charles, 


Louisana, 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


El wood, 


Nebraska. 


East Des Moines 


, Iowa. 


Ft. Collins, 


Colorado. 


Franklin, 


Iowa. 


Horton, 


Iowa. 


Lyons, 


Iowa. 


Davenport, 


Iowa. 


El wood, 


Nebraska. 


Le Claire, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Hamburg, 


Iowa. 




—Total 29 



26 



Iow.v State College oe 



1884. 



J. F. Armstrong, B. Sc, 

M. E. Bell, B. Sc, 

T. F. Bevington, B. Sc. 

G, R. Chatburn, B. C. E., 

C. J. Clark, B. Sc, 

J. E. Daughtery, J?. C. E., 

W. P. Dickey, B. Sc, 

L. M.Garrett, B. Sc, 

J. W. Gill; B. C. E., 

B. T. Hainer, B. Sc, 

H. H. [Hainer] Gabel P. Sc, 
A. E. [Henry] Quint, B. Sc, 

M. Ph., 
G. B. Hibbs, B. Sc, 
A. S. Hitchcock, B S. A., 

F. A. Huntley, P. S. A , 
\\ I,. Lambert, B. S. A., 

W. E: D Morrison, I). V. M., 

E. .1. Nichols, 15. C. E., 

G. M. Osborn, I). V. M.. 

F. L. Pitman, B. C. E., 
.1. V. Porter, P. C. E. 
Addie [Pice] Hainer, P». Sc, 
0. II. Sloan, B. Sc., 

( J. \V. Thompson, P. ('. E., 

C. Vincent, P. Sc, 
M. Vincent, li. S. A., 

Olive [Weatherby] Marsh, B.Sc 

W.J. Wicks, P. Sc, 
W. II. Wicr, B. Sc, 
Alfred Williams. P. ( !. E., 
Fannie P. Wilson, p>. Sc, 
(;. W. Wormlcv, P.. 0. E.. 



Bangor, 


Iowa. 


Missouri Valley. 


Towa. 


Council Bluffs, 


Iowa. 


Plattsmouth, 


Nebraska. 


Denver, 


Colorado. 




Kansas. 


Palmer, 


Iowa. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Lawn Ridge, 


Missouri. 


Ann Arbor, 


Michigan. 


Arcadia, 


Iowa. 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 


Angus, 


Iowa. 


Iowa City, 


Iowa. 


Minneapolis, 


Minnesota 


Charles City, 


Iowa. 


Sioux City, 


Iowa. 


Clear Lake, 


Iowa. 


Missouri Valley, 


Iowa. 


Clyde, 


Kansas. 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Fairmount, 


Nebraska. 


( )asey, 


Iowa. 


Tabor, 


Iowa. 


LeMars, 


Iowa. 


, Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


1 [arlan, 


Iowa. 


Story City, 


Iowa. 


( Georgetown, 


Iowa. 


Onawa, 


Iowa. 


Newton. 


Iowa. 



1885. 



Total :;ii. 



C. S. Bowie, P. M. E„ 
L. < i. Brown, P. < '. E.. 



Elida, 

Dexter 



I llinois. 
Iowa. 



1I0ULTURE AND 



Mechanic A ins. 



C. A. Cary, B. 8c., Millersburg, 
I). \\. Collier, B. S. A., Ft. Tatlen, 

D. E Collins. D. V. M., Emmetsburg, 
G. F. Good no, P>. Sc., Ames, 

(4. H. Glover, B. 8c, I). V. M., Longmount, 

E. Gray, B. C. E., Talleyrand, 
W. A. Grow, B. Sc, West Side, 
W. M. Hays, B. S. A , Ames, 

E. X. Hill, B. M. E., Galesburg, 
I). L. Hutchinson, B. C. E., Zenorsville, 
Hannah [Hutton] Shearer, B.Sc ,Des Moines, 
L. I). .Jackson B. M. E;, Ames, 

M. E. Johnson, D. V. M , Villisca, 

G. \V. Knorr, 15. S. A., Springville, 

C. .1. Lee, B. Sc., Zenorsville, 

F. Leverett, B. Sc, Denmark, 
J. C. Lipes, B. Sc, Mt. Ayr, 
C. B. Lqck wood, B. C. E.; Chicago, 
Anna G. McConnon, B. Sc, Ames, 

L. F. McCoy, B. C. E., Dumont, 

A. (I. Moiser, B. C. E., Des Moines, 

Anna L. Nichols, B Sc, State Center. 

W. B. Niles, D. V. M., Ames, 

(). G. Norton, B. S. A., Durant, 
J. G. Pope, B. M. E. 

Emma M. Porter, B. Sc, Woodbine, 

A. U. Quint, B. Sc, Carroll, 

E. E. Savers. I). V. M., Marits, 

F. S. Schoenleber, B. S. A., Ames, 
I. B. Schreckengast, B. Sc, Keota, 
Lydia A. Schreckengast, B. Sc, Keota. 

S. Stewart, M. D., D. V. M., Oakland, 

C. E. Fnderhill, B. Sc, Cherokee, 

Total number of graduates, 323. 



Iowa. 

Dakota. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Colorado. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Illinois. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Kentucky. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Illinois. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Ohio. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 



-Total 35. 



28 Iowa State College oe 



Historical, 



In 1858 the Legislature of [owa passed an act to establish "A 
State Agricultural College and Model Farm," to be connected 
with the entire agricultural interests of the State; appointed a 
board of commissioners to buy a farm and erect a college building, 
and elected a board of trustees to select a faculty and organize a 
college. In 1859 a farm of six hundred and forty acres, situated 
near Ames, was purchased for the use of the college. This college 
and farm were entirely an agricultural institution. 

In 18(J2 a bill was passed by Congress entitled : "An act donat- 
ing Public Lauds to the several States and Territories which may 
provide colleges for the benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic 
Arts." 

Section 1, of this bill says : "Be it enacted by the Senate and 
House of Representatives of the United States of America in Con- 
gress assembled, that there be granted to the several States for the 
purpose hereinafter mentioned, an amount of public land, to be 
apportioned to each State in quantity equal to thirty thousand 
acres for each Senator and Representative in Congress to which 
t be States are respectively entitled by the apportionment under 
the census of 1860 : Provided that no mineral lands shall be se- 
lected or purchased under the provisions of this act." 

Section I requires: "That all moneys derived from the sale of 
the lands aforesaid by the States to which the 1 lands are appor- 
tioned, and from lie sale of land scrip, hereinbefore provided for, 
shall be invested in stocks of (be United States, or some other 
safe stock, yielding not less (ban live per centum on the par value 
of -aid stocks; and thai t be money so in vested shall constitute a 
perpetual fund, t be capital of which shall remain forever undi- 
minished, (except as may be provided for in section fifth of this 
aci , I and t be interest of which shall inviolably be appropriated by 
cell State which may take and claim the benefit of this act, to 
tin- endowment, support and maintenance of at least, one college, 
where the leading objeel shall be, without excluding other scien- 



At. mi i i 1 1 re \m> Mechanic Arts. 29 



tific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach 
such branches of Learning as arc related to agriculture and the 

mechanic arts, in such manner as the Legislatures of the States 
may prescribe, in order to promote the liheral and practical edu- 
cation of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and profes- 
sions of life." 

Section •") says : "And be it further enacted, That the grant of 
land and land scrip hereby authorized shall be made on the fol- 
lowing conditions, to which as well as to the provisions hereinbe- 
fore contained, the previous assent of the several States shall be 
signified by Legislative acts : First; If any portion of the fund 
invested as provided by the foregoing section, or any portion of 
the interest thereon, shall, by any action or contingency, be dimin- 
ished or lost, it shall be replaced by the State to which it belongs, 
so that the capital of the fund shall remain forever undiminished; 
and the annual interest shall be regularly applied without diminu- 
tion to the purposes mentioned in the fourth section of this act, 
except that a sum not exceeding ten per centum upon the amount 
received by any State under the provisions of this act, may be 
expended for the purchase of lands for sites or experimental farms, 
wherever authorized by the respective Legislatures of said States. 
Second; No portion of said fund nor the interest thereon, shall be 
applied, directly or indirectly, under any pretense whatever, to 
the purchase, erection, preservation, or repair of any building or 
buildings." 

In 1862 the General Assembly accepted the grant upon the 
conditions and under the restrictions contained in the act of Con- 
gress, and by so doing entered into a contract with the General 
Government to erect and keep in repair all buildings necessary 
for the use of the College. By this action of the General Assem- 
bly the College was changed from a purely agricultural institu- 
tion to a College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, with the 
broad and liberal course of study outlined in the following para- 
graph. 

In 1882 the General Assembly passed an act denning the 
course of study to be pursued, as follows : Section 1. That section 
1621 of the Code is hereby repealed, and the following is enacted 
in lieu thereof: Section 1621. That there shall be adopted and 
taught at the State Agricultural College, a broad, liberal and prac- 
tical course of study in which the leading branches of learning 
shall relate to agriculture and the mechanic arts, and which shall 



30 Iowa State College of 



also embrace such other brandies of learning as will most practi- 
cally and liberally educate the agricultural and industrial classes 
in the several pursuits and professions of life, including military 
tactics. Section 2. That all acts and parts of acts inconsistent 
with this act are hereby repealed. 

The College was formally opened on the 17th of March, 1869. 
It will consequently, at the end of the present term, November 9, 
complete its eighteenth year. 

The income from the endowment fund averages about $45,000 
per year, about $30,900 of which is expended for salaries of pro- 
lessors, assistant professors, instructors and foremen. The remain- 
der is required for the necessary running expenses of the various 
departments and minor expenditures of the College, and for the 
purchase of chemical, physical and other apparatus. New build- 
ings are erected, and repairs are made from special Legislative 
appropriations for the purpose. 



Location. 



The College occupies a delightful and healthful location, on 
high rolling land a mile and a half west of the town of Ames, at 
the junction or crossing of two lines of the Chicago &, North- 
western Railway, in the center county (Story) of the State, and 
thirty miles north of the city of Des Moines. The railroad facil- 
ities for reaching Ames from every part of the State are good. 
Regular conveyances for passengers and baggage run between the 
station and the College three times each day. 



Buildings, Grounds and Equipments. 



The .Main College Building is four stories high above the base- 
ment, and is 158 feet long by 112 feet deep through the wings, in 
i he basement, (which is almost wholly above ground and is thor- 
oughly lighted and well ventilated), are the dining-room, kitchen, 
rooms for help, and the armory. On the first floor, proper, are the 
chapel, the library, reception rooms, recitation rooms, music rooms, 
and offices of the teachers and of thesteward. On the second floor 



Agriculture and Mechanic Aims. 31 



are Beveral recitation rooms and rooms for students. On the third 
and fourth floors are students' rooms and the zoological and geolog- 
ical museums About two hundred students can be accommodated 
with rooms in this building. All the rooms are heated by steam 
and lighted by electricity. Purespring water is supplied in all the 
stories of the building, forced up by steam pump. 

There are also two Boarding Cottages, brick buildings afford- 
ing rooms for ninety students, with dining-rooms, kitchens, and 
store-rooms. The cottages are supplied with pure water and 
lighted by electricity. 

The Chemical and Physical Hall is a large two-story brick 
building, 70 by 44 feet, with a wing 61 by 31 feet. The first floor 
contains the chemical laboratories ; the second the physical labor- 
atory, apparatus and lecture room, while two draughting rooms 
occupy the third floor. In the basement are the heating apparatus 
and a large recitation room. This building is warmed by steam 
and supplied with water and gas. 

North Hall is a two-story brick building, 40 by 70 feet. On 
the first floor are the rooms for the departments of agriculture and 
zoology, and on the second floor are the rooms of the botanical 
department. 

Horticultural Hall is a frame building containing on the 
first floor a large lecture room and a tool room. On the second 
floor is the horticultural museum. The cellar has two large 
rooms, one for the storage of garden products, the other for the 
use of the nursery propagating department. A grafting. room and 
propagating house are attached, heated by hot water. 

South Hall is a two-story brick building which has been refit- 
ted for the Department of Domestic Economy, and contains the 
accessories of a model home as apparatus for instruction. 

The Office is a substantial two-story brick building for the 
use of the Board of Trustees, the President, Secretary and Treas- 
urer. 

Six dwelling-houses upon the College grounds are occupied 
by professors' families, and several others by assistants and fore- 
men. 

The College Creamery, a frame building, is conveniently sit- 
uated near the farm house. The farm barns are adjacent — one of 
brick, for horses, and one large frame barn, in the basement of 
which is a stable for one hundred head of cattle. 

The Veterinary Buildings, costing ten thousand dollars, com- 



32 Iowa State College of 



prise,— a building for the offices and class-rooms of professors in 
this department, and a hospital with all the modern appliances 
for the treatment of diseased animals. The Department of Veteri- 
nary Science is the best equipped for work of any in the Western 
States. 

The Work-shop is a two-story frame building, fitted up with 
power, machinery and tools for the prosecution of repairs, and for 
instruction in mechanical work in wood. 

The new Hall for the Department of Civil and Mechanical En- 
gineering is a substantial brick building, one of the most commo- 
dious and attractive on the College Domain, and furnishes all nec- 
essary accommodations for these rapidly growing departments; 
including power, machinery and tools for working in iron and 
other metals. 

THE COLLEGE GROUNDS. 

The College Domain includes 900 acres. Of this about 120 
acres are set apart for College Grounds. These occupy the high 
Land of the southwest part of the farm and include the campus, 
shrubbery plantations, young forestry plantations, the flower bor- 
ders and gardens, with the surroundings of the professors' dwell- 
ings. Gravel drives and walks lead to all parts of the grounds 
and to the various buildings, and the true principles of landscape 
gardening have been so faithfully observed in the grading and in 
die location of buildings and drives as to make of the entire cam- 
pus a large and beautiful park. The view of the surrounding 
country from the upper stories and towers of the Main Building 
is one of wide extent and great beauty. 



Agriculture and Mechanic A ins. )U3 



Directions to Candidates and Students, 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Students seeking- admission to the College must be at least 
sixteen years of age. 

Candidates for membership in the Freshman class must bring 
testimonials of good moral character and give evidence of a thor- 
ough knowledge of Orthography, English Grammar, Arithmetic, 
United States History, Human Physiology and (except in the 
Veterinary course) Algebra through simple equations, and those 
who wish to pursue Latin, especially in the gentlemen's courses, 
should show a thorough knowledge of the Latin Paradigms, and 
of the Latin Header or Lessons. 

Entrance examinations will be held at the College on the first 
and second days of each term. The first class teachers' certifi- 
cates of a county superintendent will be received in lieu of an ex- 
amination in the studies covered thereby. Special arrangements 
may be made with the President of the College for examinations 
by the principals of high schools having an approved course of 
study, but all such examinations and certificates must date with- 
in six months. 

( andidates may be conditioned for one year in physiology, if 
their examinations show high standing in all other required 
branches. 

Candidates for advanced standing must pass examinations 
here in all studies pursued up to the time and grade they wish to 
enter. Those from other colleges must bring certificates of hon- 
orable dismission and marks showing standing. The latter may, 
on approval by the Faculty of the College, be taken in lieu of 
examination. 

N. B.— THE COLLEGE YE A K begins February 23d, net in September. (See cal- 
endar, page 5). That is the only proper time for new students to enter, unless fully 
prepared for adraneed standing. Still further, it is almost invariably true that even 
a few da)s' absence at the beginning of any term makes real success impossible for 
the tardy pupil, and greatly retards the class he tries to overtake. Students who 
arrive later than the second week of any term will not be admitted except on 
clear proof of ability to overtake and keep up with the class. One must be on 
band when the train starts or wait for the next train. The College has no Prepar- 
atory Department. See the last page before the Index. 



34 Iowa State College of 

HOW TO ENTER THE COLLEGE. 
Persons who desire to enter the College will comply with the 
following directions : 

1. Write to the President, at least one month before the be- 
ginning of the term, asking for a card of inquiry and informa- 
tion. 

2. On receiving the card of inquiry, write an answer oppo- 
site each question and mail the card to the President. If the 
answers you give accord with the "Requirements for Admission," 
a card of introduction will be sent you, which simply entitles you 
to admission on passing the examinations or giving the required 
proof of proficiency. 

8. When you arrive, at the opening of the term, present this 
card of introduction to the Steward, in his office at the rear of the 
chapel in the main building; select your room, pay the rent, make 
your deposit, (see page 36) and, without loss of time, show your re- 
ceipt therefor to the President at his office, south of the main 
building. If you have not the proper certificate of proficiency in 
the studies required, you will there secure a card for examination. 

4. Attend punctually every examination at the time and 
place indicated on that card. When all the examinations are 
completed, and your standings therein are marked on the card, 
return it to the President at his office. If you have passed the 
studies required with a standing of 3 or over, (4 being perfect), 
you will then sign the Student's Record Book and Contract, and 
secure a card of classification, which certifies your admission to the 
( lollege and assigns you to your proper classes. 

"). Present the card of classification to each of the teachers 
having charge of the classes to which you are assigned, and 
attend thereafter every recitation of the term. 

The contract signed by every student upon entering the Col- 
lege and by the President of the College, is as follows : 

We, the Faculty of Iowa Agricultural college, hereby agree that we 
will guarantee to the students of 1887 all the privileges and instruction set 
forili in the college Catalogue, and that the laws we make shall be simply 
for their advancement and the good government of the institution. 

W. I. Chamberlain, President. 

i, hereby agree, on entering the college, in ihht, that I win respect aud 

Obey Its laws, and, except In ease or necessity, Illness or unforseen misfor- 
tune, remain I he entire term on which i enter 

signed .Student. 



A.ORICULTUR1 \m> Mechanic Arts. 35 



THE CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS. 

Students having back studies at the commencement of any 

term may, at the discretion of the Executive, be classified in all 
such back studies. 

X. B. — To enable students to pass examinations in any back 
studies, such examinations as may be necessary will be held during 
the first week of each term. At the beginning of the year in Febru- 
ary no student can classify for promotion unless he has passed a 
satisfactory examination on all studies but one of the preceding 
year, and that study must be passed by the end of the first week 
of the next term. 

nrspp notice in Mack faced typo, page 33. Also the last page before the Index. 



STUDENTS' EXPENSES, ETC. 

No charge is made for tuition to Iowa students. To those 
who come from outside the State $15.00 tuition per term will be 
charged. 

For board, heating, lighting, cleaning and care of the college 
buildings, students pay what the items actually cost the Institu- 
tion. Injury to college property, of whatever sort, is charged to 
the author, when known; otherwise to the section, or the entire 
body of students, as may seem most just in the given case. 

Students who board in any of the college buildings furnish 
their own bedding, and all furniture for their rooms, excepting 
bedsteads, washstands, tables and wardrobes. Male students in 
the two lower classes, not physically disabled, are required by law 
to take the military drill, and purchase uniforms therefor. 

The current expenses of students during the year 1880, were 

about as follows : 

In the Main College Building:— 
Board per week $2 25 

Lighting and heating, per week. 40 

Incidentals per week 21 

Room rent, per term 3 00 to 4 00 

Hospital fees per term*-. 75 

In the Boarding Halls :— 

Board per week, including fuel and lighting 2 10 

Janitor's fee, per term 3 00 

Hospital fees, per term 75 

For day students :— 

. Janitor's fee, per term of seventeen weeks -- 4 00 

Room rent 2 00 to 3 00 

' Note— A commodious and secluded hospital building is provided, and this 
hospital fee of 75 cents insures to each student free nursing and medical attend- 
ance in case of accident or sickness. This gives the means also of checking and 
controlling the measles and other contagious diseases should they appear. The 
hospital has proved to be a great blessing to the students. 

Students who pay for board by the term in advance, can secure a reduction 
of 10 cents per week. This applies to all the boarding departments 



State College of 



As security for the payment of all Mils against him, each stu- 
dent, at the opening of the term, is required to make deposits 
with the Steward as follows : 

On board, account in main building (for those who board there).. .$20 00 
On board account in boarding- hall (for those who board there). . . 15 00 

On room and furniture account 5 00 

On general breakage and damage account l 00 

These deposits will be returned on final settlement at the close of the term. 

All hills for each month must, without fail, be settled at the 
Steward's office on the second Saturday of the month following. 

The dining room will be opened on the evening preceding 
the respective days on which the spring and fall terms commence. 
No allowance on board bills is made for absences of less than one 
week's duration, and notice of absence must be promptly given 
to the steward. Students and others who bring guests to their 
tables are required to purchase meal tickets. The meals are fur- 
nished at cost. All students are required to board and room in 
the main building or in one of the cottages, except where permis- 
sion to board elsewhere has been for good reason granted by the 
President. 

Text-books and stationery may be purchased at the College 
Hook-store at ten per cent, advance on publishers' wholesale prices. 



MANUAL LABOR— SHOP AND LABORATORY PRACTICE. 

The following regulations in regard to manual labor have 
been adopted by the Board of Trustees: 

1. The manual labor of students is divided into two kinds, 
viz: uninstructive labor, which shall be paid for in money; and 
instructive labor, which shall be compensated by the instruction 
given and ihe skill acquired. 

i'. Uninstructive labor shall comprise all the operations in 
l be work-shop, t lie garden, upon the farm and elsewhere, in which 
the work done aeernes to the benefit of the College and not to 
that of the student. Instructive labor shall embrace all those op- 
erations in the work-shops, museum, laboratories, experimental 
kitchen, upon the farm and in the gardens, in which the sole 
purpose of die student is the acquisition of knowledge and skill. 

:;. Students shall engage in instructive labor in the presence 
and under tin' Instruction of the professor in charge, according to 
the statement made in each of the courses of study. 



Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 37 



4. The compensated labor furnished l>y the department of 
Agriculture and I [orticulture, of Veterinary Science and of Engi- 
neering, is given by each to its own students, and iseagerly sought. 

5. The "details" of compensated laborsupplied by the needs 
of the other departments will be given to the most faithful and 
meritorious students of the Course in Sciences related to the In- 
dustries. 

6. Uninstructive labor is paid for according to its value to 
the College, but no student should expect to pay the main part of 
his expenses by labor while here. 

GOVERNMENT. 

The crowded buildings of the college and the nature of the 
exercises, complicated as they are by laboratory work, shop prac- 
tice and manual labor, make order, punctuality and systematic 
effort indispensable. This Institution, therefore, offers no in- 
ducements to the idle or self-indulgent. All who are too 
independent to submit to needful authority, or too reckless to 
accept wholesome restraint, are advised to go where the courses of 
study are easier, and the requirements are consequently less. 
The discipline of the college is confined mainly to sending 
away promptly those who prove on fair trial to be of the above 
• lass, and to be doing more harm to the institution than can be 
compensated by any benefit they may themselves receive. Those 
who share here the benefits of the State and National endow- 
ments are expected to show themselves worthy of them. 

The use of tobacco by students is forbidden in all the build- 
ings and on the College grounds. The presence of ladies and of 
members of the Faculty in the various rooms and halls renders 
this imperative, to say nothing of other considerations. Those 
who are already so addicted to the use of tobacco that they can- 
not cheerfully submit to this regulation are advised to go else- 
where. Of course the use of intoxicating beverages and of pro- 
fane and obscene language is also forbidden. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP. 
Officers and students gather daily in the chapel for public 
worship. On Sunday afternoon a discourse is given in the chapel 
by the President, one of the Professors, or a Clergyman invited for 
the occasion. The object of these services is to emphasize and 
enforce the principles of the Christian religion ; but in a State 
Institution like this if would be manifestly improper to teach or 
to controvert the tenets of sectarianism. 



38 Iowa State College of 



The faculty require on Sunday such conduct and decorum in 
and about the college buildings as are fitting to the observance 
of the Sabbath. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

Seven courses of study are offered, as follows: 

(1) The General Course in the Sciences related to the Indus- 
tries, requires four years and aims to give a liberal culture in the 
sciences and other branches of learning which underlie the great 
industries of the country, without especially directing it towards 
any particular pursuit or profession. The degree of Bachelor of 
Science ( H. Sc.) is conferred upon those who complete this 
course. 

(2) The General Course for Ladies requires four years and 
meets a growing demand for the higher education of women. It 
provides an opportunity for a more thorough study of literature 
along with a somewhat lighter course in the natural sciences and 
mathematics. It leads to the degree of Bachelor of Letters 
(B. L.) 

The other live courses are technical and aim to meet the re- 
quirements of a special pursuit or profession. Those established 
are as follows: 

(3) The Course in Agriculture, which requires four years of 
study, leads to the degree of Bachelor of Scientific Agricul- 
ture, i B. S. A.) 

(4 1 The Course in Mechanical Engineering, of four years, 
leads to the degree of Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering, (B. 
M. E.) 

The Course in Civil Engineering, of four years, leads to 
the degree of Bachelor of Civil Engineering, (B. C. E.) 

Mil The Course in Veterinary Science, of two years, lead< to 
the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, (D. V. M.) 

(7) The Course in Domestic Enonomy, of two years, is for 
posl graduates, and leads to the degree of Master of Domestic 
Economy (M. I). E.) 

The candidate for graduation in any course must have secured 
a standing of :; | 1 being perfect) in all his studies, and must pre- 
sent a lii i; 1 1 thesis, as required by college law, and fully explained 
in another part of this catalogue. 

The graduation fee in each course is live dollars. For the full 
course of Study in each of the above courses, and for remarks 

thereon, see the following pages. 

S/TSu- not Ire in Muck fare 1)|>«>, page 'M. AIno, the last page before the Index. 



Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 



39 



The General Course in the Sciences Related to 
the Industries, 



Freshman Year. 


FIRST term. 


SECOND TERM. 


Advanced Algebra—")* 


Geometry— 5. 


English Language and Composition--!. 


Applied Rhetoric— 3, or Latin— 5. 


History— 5, or Latin—"). 


Elementary Botany— 2. 


Elocutionary Drill— I. 


Elementary Zoology— 2. 


Drawing J. 


Elocution— 2. 


Stock Breeding— 2. 


Drawing— 2. 


Military Drill — l. 


Practical Horticulture— 2. 




Military Drill— 1. 


*These llgures Indicate the number of recitations per week. 


Sophomore Year. 


FIRST TERM. 


SECOND TERM. 


Botany— 2. 


Zoology— 3. 


General chemistry— 3. 


Laboratory Practice— 1. 


Laboratory Practice— 2. 


Botany: Vegetable Anatomy— 3. 


Entomology— 2. 


Laboratory Practice— l. 


Physics: Mechanics— 2. 


Physics: Heat and Electricity— :5. 


Plane Trigonometry— 5, nine weeks. 


General Chemistry— 2. 


Land Surveying— 5, eight weeks. 


Laboratory Practice— 2. 


Field Practice— 2. 


Practical Agriculture— 2. 


Elocution— 2. 


Analytical Geometry— 5.f 


Military Drill— 1. 


Military Drill— l. 


*In all Laboratory work three hou 


•s count as one recitation. 


fStudents taking Analytical Geom 


3try omit Zoology or Botany. 


Junior 


Year. 


FIRST TERM. 


SECOND TEKM. 


Electlves (see page 58). 


Electlves (see page 53). 


Botany: Vegetable Anatomy 


Physiology— 4. 


and Physiology— 3. 


Political Economy— 3. 


Laboratory Practice— 1. 


commercial Law— 2. 


Physics: Electricity, Optics 


Astronomy— 3. 


and Acoustics— 3. 


Laboratory Practice in Physies— 1 . 


English Literature— 5. 


Organic Chemistry— 3. 


Quantitative chemistry— 2. 


Laboratory Practice— l. 


Laboratory Practice— 2. 


German— 5. 


Calculus— 5. 


One Dissertation. 


German— 5 . 




Zoology— 2. 




Laboratory Practice— l. 




Senior 


Year. 


FIRST TERM. 


SECOND TERM. 


Electlves (see page 58). 


Elective.** (see page 53). 


Geology and Mineralogy— 5. 


Ethics— 5, eleven weeks. 


Psychology— 5. 


Literary Criticism— 5, six weeks. 


Laboratory Practice in Agricultural 


History of Civilization— 5. 


Chemistry— 2. 


Veterinary Medicine and Surgery— 5. 


Anatomy of Domestic Animals— 5. 


Preparation of Thesis. 


German— 4. 




One Dissertation. 





Note.— For remarks on this course see pages 53 to 70. For list of text books see 
pages 48 to 52. 

Elocution (2) Is an optional In first term Junior and second term Senior years. 



40 



Tow a Spate College of 



The 



General 



Course for Ladies, 



FIRST TERM 



Freshman Year. 



SECOND TERM. 



Advanced Algebra— 5. 
Latin or French— 5 
Drawing— 2. 
Domestic Economy— 1. 

Laboratory Practice— l. 
English Language and 

tion-4. 
Klocutlonary Drill— 1. 



Composi- 



Geometry— 5. 

Latin or French— 5. 

Applied Rhetoric—:;. 

Elementary Botany— 2. 

Drawing— 2. 

Elocution- 2. 

Elementary Zoology— 2 optional. 



Sophomore Year. 



FIRST TERM. 



SECOND TERM. 



Lati-n or French l. 

Modern History— 2. 

Botany— 2. 

Elocution— 2. 

"And choice of Chemistry— 3, and Lab- 
oratory Practice— 2, or any two of 
following sciences; Entomology— 2; 
Physics: Mechanics— 2; Plane Trig- 
onometry— 5, 9 weeks. 



Latin or French— 4. 

Ancient History— 2. 

Domestic Economy— 1. 
Laboratory Practice— 1. 

'And choice of two of follow'g Sciences 
Zoology- 3, Lab. Prac— 1; Vegetable 
Anatomy— 3, Lab. Prac— 1; Physics: 
Heat and Electricity— 3; Chemistry 
—2; Lab. prac— 2; Analytical Geom- 
etry —5. 



Junior Year. 



FIRST TERM. 



SECOND TERM. 



German— 5. 

English Literature- 5. 

*And choice of two of the following 
Sciences: vegetable Physiology— 3, 
Lab. prac— l; Quantitative Chemis- 
try 2, Lab. prac— 2; Physics: Elec- 
tricity, Optics and Acoustics— 3; Cal- 
culus— 5; Zoology -2, Lab. prac 1. 



German— 5: 

Political Economy— 3. 

One Dissertation. 

Domestic Economy— 1. 
Laboratory Practice— 1. 

*And from the following Sciences a 
choice of not less than five nor more 
than eight exercises per week: Or- 
ganic chemistry- 3, hab. practice— 
1; Astronomy— 3, Laboratory Prac- 
tice in Physics— 1; commercial Law 



Senior Year. 



FIKST TERM. 



SECOND TERM. 



Psychology •>. 
German- i. 
one Dissertation. 

ecology, or Chemistry of the iirst term 
Sophomore or first term Junior year. 



Ethics—;"), 12 weeks. 
Literary Criticism 5, 6 weeks. 
History of Civilization— 5. 
Physiology— 4. 

Preparation of Thesis. 



•Provided always thai no science shall he elected for less than two terms, oorany 
which the pupil is ii. -i prepared to take. 

v.ii. For remarks on this course of study see page70. For list of text hooks 
,i ee pag< 18 to 52, 



Agriculture and Mechanic Arti 



41 



The Course in Agriculture, 



Freshman Year. 


FIRST term. second term. 


Stock Breeding— 2. Practical Horticulture— 2. 


Farm and Garden Work 12 hours 


F'arm and Garden Work 12 hours 


each week. 


each week. 


Advanced Algebra— 5. 


Elementary Bocany— 2. 


History— .">. 


Elementary Zoology 2. 


English Language and « omposition-4. 


Geometry—") 


Drawing— 2. 


Dairying— 2. 


Military Drill— 1. 


Applied Rhetoric -3. 


Elocutionary Drill— 1. 


Elocution— 2. 




Drawing— 2. 




Military Drill— 1. 


Sophomore Year. 


FIRST TERM. .SECOND TERM. 


Botany— 2. | Zoology— 3. 


General Chemistry— 3. 


Laboratory Practice— 1. 


Laboratory Practice— 2. 


Botany : Vegetable Anatomy- •"». 


Entomology— 2. 


Laboratory Practice— 1. 


Physics : Mechanics— 2. 


Physics : Heat and Electricity— 3. 


Plane Trigonometry— 5, 9 weeks. 


General Chemistry— 2. 


Land Surveying— 5, 8 weeks. 


Laboratory Practice— 2. 


Field Practice— 2, 8 weeks. 


Horticulture— 2. 


Elocution— 2. 


Practical Agriculture— 2. 


Junior Year. 


FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. 


Horticulture— 2. 


Applied Botany— 2. 


Practice In Agriculture and Horticul 


Practice in Agriculture, 8 hours per 


ture, 8 hours per week. 


week. 


Botany: Vegetable Anatomy and 


Horticulture— 3. 


Physiology— 3. 


Organic Chemistry— 3. 


Laboratory Practice— l . 


Laboratory Practice— 1. 


Quantitative Chemistry— 2. 


Commercial Law— 2. ) nrr , Pmi ,, n -, 
Political Economy -3. j U1 ^iman-,j. 


Laboratory Practice— 2. 


Zoology— 2. ) 
Laboratory Practice— 1. / 


One Dissertation. 




Physics : Electricity, Optics and 


Accoustics— 3. 




English Literature-."), or 




German— 5. 




Senior Year. 


FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. 


Stock Feeding— l. Farm Drainage— 1. 


Experimental Agriculture— 4. 


Climatology— 1. 


Laboratory Practice in Agriculture 


Agriculture— 3. 


10 hours per week. 


Laboratory Practice in Agriculture 


Anatomy of Domestic Animals— 5. 


10 hours per week. 


Laboratory Work in Agricultural 


Veterinary Medicine—."). 


Chemistry— 2. 


Diseases of Plants- -3. ) 
Injurious Insects--2. / 


Geology— 5, or 


Psychology— r>. 


History of Civilization--f). 


German— 4. 


Preparation of Thesis. 


One Dissertation. 





Note.— For remarks on the above course, see pages 71 to 73. 
used see pages 48 to 52. 



For text books 



42 



Iowa State College of 



The Course in Mechanical Engineering 

Freshman Year. 

FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. 



Ail Minced Algebra — 5. 
Free-hand Drawing 4 hours per week. 
Shop Practice 10 hours per week. 
English Language and 

Composition --4. 
French— 5. 
Military Drill— 1. 
Elocutionary Drill— 1, 



Geometry- -5. 

Free-hand Drawing 4 h'rsper week. 

Shop Practice 10 hours per week. 

Applied Rhetoric—}. 

French — 5. 

Elocution — 2. 

Military Drill— 1. 



Sophomore Year. 

FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. 



Plane Trigonometry— 5, 9 weeks. 

Land Surveying — 5, 8 weeks. 

Physics : Mechanics— 2. 

Field Practice 2, 8 weeks. 

General Chemistry — 3. 

Laboratory Practice -2. 

Shop Practice 10 hours per week. 

Elocntion--2. 



Principles of Mechanism — 2. 
Mechanical Drawing 6 h'rs per 
Analytical Geometry---5. 
Descriptive Geometry--2. 
Physics: Heat and Elictricity— 3. 
Shop Practice 10 hours per week. 



week, 



Junior Year. 



FIRST TERM. 



SECOND TERM. 



Principles of Mechanism— 5. 8 necks. 
Resistance of Materials— 5, 9 weks. 
Shop Practice 10 hours per week. 
Mechanical Drawing 6 hours per w'k. 
Differential and Integral Calculus— 5. 
Physic-: Electricity, Optics and 
Acoustics— 8. 



Analytical Mechanics- -5> 

Thermodynamics— 3. 

Shop Practice 10 hours per week. 

Political Economy— 3. 

One Dissertation. 

Mechanical Drawing 6 hours per w'k 

Laboratory Practice in Physics— 2. 



Senior Year. 



FIRST TERM. 



SECOND TERM 



Mechanical Engineering 5. 
shop Practice 10 hours per week. 
Mechanical Drawing 6 h'rs per week. 
Psychology- 5. 
i uic Dissertation. 



Mechanical Engineering— 2. 

Shop Practice 10 hours per week. 
Mechanical Drawing (i h'rs per week. 
History of Civilization— 5. 
Ethics— 5, il weeks. 
Preparation of Thesis. 



New b For i "in. ii k - 
used -' ■ pag< 18 to 52. 



For t( xt- books 



Agriculture and Mechanic Aims. 43 



The Course in Civil Engineer! 



Freshman Year. 

FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. 

Advanced Algebra— 5. Geometry 5 

Free-hand Drawing \ hours per week Free-hand Drawing— 4 hrs. per week. 

French— 5. French— 5. 

English Language and composltton-t Elementary Botany— 2. 

lllstorv— :>. Military Drill— 1. 

Military Drill— l. Elocution— 2 

Elocutionary Drill— l. Applied Rhetoric— 3, (optional.) 



Sophomore Year. 

FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM, 



Plane Trigonometry--"), y weeks. Railroad Surveying— 3. 

Land Surveying— 5, 8 weeks. Field Practice -2. 

Field Practice .. 2, 8 weeks. Analytical Geometry— 5 

Physics: Mechanics— 2. Descriptive Geometry— 2. 
systematic Botany— 2. Laboratory Practice- l. 

General chemistry— 3. Physics: Heat and Electricity- -3. 
Laboratory Practice -2. 



Junior Year. 

FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. 



Railroad Surveying— 3, s weeks. Analytical Mechanics— 5. 

Field Practice--1. Field Practice and Office Work— 3 

Resistance of Materials --5, 9 weeks. Political Economy— 3. 

Stereotomy— 2. Astronomy - -3. 

Draughting— 2. Sanitary Engineering— 3. 

Differential and Integral Calculus- -5. One Dissertation. 
Physics: Electricity, Optics and i 
Acoustics— 3. 



Senior Year. 

FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. 



Hoof and Bridge Structures— 5. Roof and Bridge Structures- 5. 

Designing- 3. Designing- 3. 

Geology and Mineralogy- 5. Retaining Walls— 2. 

Psychology--/!. Ethics- 5, 11 weeks. 

Structure of Woods—] . History of Civilization—."). 

One Dissertation. Preparation of Thesis. 



Note. -For remarks on tiie above course see page 7b. For list of textbook? 
used see pages 48 to 52. 



u 



Iowa State College of 



The Course in Jleterinarv Science, 



Junior Year. 



FIRST TERM. 



second term. 



Materia Medica — 2. 

Anatomy of Domestic Animal. 5 

Zoology— 2. 

Botany- -2. 

Chemistry-—'!. 

Laboratory Practice — 2. 
Clinics ") hours per week. 



Veterinary Medi rine and Surgery- 
Materia Medica—2. 
Analytical Chemistry— 2, 4 weeKs. 
Urine Analysis and Toxicology- 
Weeks. 
Laboratory Practice- 2. 
Comparative Anatomy — 4. 
Ophthalmology- 1. 
Animal Parasites-— 2. 
Histology--2. 
Clinics r> hours per week. 



Senior Year. 



FIRST TERM. 

Surgery— 3. 
Cryptogamic Botany — 1 

Laboratory Practice- 
Therapeutics -2. 
Physiology — 3. 
Pathology — 2. 
Clinics 5 hours per week. 



SECOND TERM. 



Practice of Veterinary .Medicine-:). 
Pathology— 3. 
Therapeutics— 2. 
Ophthalmology— 1. 
Surgical Therapeutics— 2. 
Clinics 5 hours per week. 



Note— For remarks on the above course sec pages 76 to 
see pages 18 to 52. 



For text books used 



The Fast Graduate Course in Eomestic 

Economu, 



First Year. 



FIRST TETM. 



SECOND TERM. 



Domestic Economy, 

Botany. 

Physical Training. 

Bousehold Account" 



Domestic Economy. 
Physiology and Hygiene. 
Dress-fitting and Millinery. 

Essays. 



Second Year. 



FIRST TERM, 



SECOND TERM, 



Domestic Economy. 

Chemistry. 

Duties of the Nurse. 

Designing and Free Hand Drawing. 

Landscape and Floral Gardening. 



Noii For remark* 



Domestic Economy. 

Home Architect ure, 

Home Sanitation. 

Home .Esthetics and Decorative \\\. 

Essays and Graduating Thesis. 



pag< 



\l books used set 



Agriculture and Mechanic Art 



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48 Iowa State Coll 



Alphabetical List nl Text Books and Principal 
Books of Reference 



A.GRI culture. — (See Practical Agriculture and Experimental 
Agriulture.) 

Algebra.— Loofnis. 

A \ a lytic Geometry. — Newcomb. 
Analytical Mechanics.— Wood. 
Anatomy of Domestic Animals. — Lectures. 
Applied Botany. — Lectures. 
Astronomy. — Newcomb and Holden. 

Botany. — Freshman Year. — Gray's Lessons in Botany. 

Sophomore Year. — Gray's Botanical Text Book Vol. I. 

Junior Year. — Goodale's Vegetable Anatomy and 

Physiology. 
( 'a lculus. — Buckingham. 

< Ihemistry. — Sophomore Year.— (First Term.)— Richter's Inor- 
ganic Chemistry, (General and Agr'l Courses.) 
Shepard's Elements of Chemistry, (Veterinary and 
Engineering Courses.) (Second Term.) — Richter's 
[norganic Chemistry. Douglass & Prescott's Qual- 
itative Analysis, (General and Agr'l Courses.) Ty- 
son's Examination of Urine, Lectures on Toxicol- 
ogy, i Veterinary ( Jourse.) 

Junior Year, i Fir*/ Tt rra. | Classen's Quantitative 
Analysis, Douglass & Prescott's Qualitative Analy- 
sis, (General and Agr'l Courses.) {Second Term.) — 
Etemsen's Organic Chemistry, (General and Agr'l 
( !ourses. ) 



Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 49 



Senior Year. [First Term.) — Frankland's Agr'l Chemical Anal- 
ysis. (General and Agr'J Courses.) (Second Term.) 
— Preseott's Proximate Organic Anaylsis, (General 
Course. References. — Roscoe & Schorlemmer's 

Treatise on Chemistry. Watts' Dictionary on Chem- 
istry. Wnrtz's Dictionary on Chemistry. Storer's 
Dictionary on Solubilities Presenilis' Quantita- 
tive Analysis. Sutton's Volumetric Analysis. 
Wormley on Micro-Poisons. Taylor on Poisons. 
Works on Technical Chemistry. Vaughn and oth- 
ers on Urine Analysis. 

Climatology.— Lectures. 

Commercial Law. — Parsons' Laws of Business, Lectures. 

Dairying.— Lectures, Arnold. 

Descrj ptivk Geometry.— Church. 

Diseases of Plants.— Lectures. 

Domestic Economy.— Text Books and Books of Reference. — 
Mrs. Ewing's Cookery Manuals. Mrs. 
Lincoln's Boston Cook Book. Goodhohn's 
Domestic Cyclopedia. Harder's Physiol- 
ogy of Taste. Chambers' Manual of Diet. 
Thompson's Food and Feeding. Church 
on Foods. Schutzenberg on Fermentation. 
Jago on Bread Making. Williams' Chem- 
istry of Cookery. Mrs. Plunkett's "Women, 
Plumbers and Doctors." Tracy's "Anat- 
omy, Physiology and Hygiene." Text 
Book of Nursing, by Clara T. Weeks. Tapah 
Training School for Nurses at Patterson, 
New Jersey. Dr. Bellows' Philosophy of 
Eating. 

Drawing.— Lectures, Waiter Smith's System. 
Elocution.— Monroe's Sixth Reader. 

English Literature.— Lectures, Hudson's Annotated Classics 

in Shakepeare's Plays. 



50 Iowa State College of 



Entomology. — Lectures. 

Ethics. — Hickok's Moral Science — Seelye, Lectures. 

Experimental Agriculture. — Lectures. 

Farm Drainage — Lectures. 

Geology.— Le Conte. 

( 3 eometry. — Loo-mis, 

History. — Fisher's Outlines of Universal History. 

History of Civilization. — Lectures. References, — Tyler's 

Primitive Culture. Tyler's Early 
History of Mankind. Lubbock's 
Origin of Civilization. Spencer's 
Principles of Sociology. Progress in 
(Jreat Britain. Buckle's History of 
Civilization. Kindred Articles in 
the Encyclopedias. 

Horticulture. — Lectures. Lindley's Theory and Practice in 
Horticulture. 

I njurious Insects. — Lectures. 

Language and Composition.— Lectures, Walker's Analysis of 

the English Sentence. 

Latin. — Allen and Greenough, Csesar, Virgil, Livy and other 
Latin authors. 

Literary Criticism. — Lectures. Hegel and Lotze. 

Mechanical Drawing. — Krusi. 

Military Tactics. — Lectures. Upton's United States Tactics. 
Wheeler's Art and Science of War. 

Physiology. — Martin's Human Body. 

rii ysics. —Sophomore Year.— (First Term.)— Lectures, Wood's 
Elementary Mechanics. {Second Term.)— Stewart on 
Heat; Thompson on Electricity. 
Junior Year .—( First Zferm.) Thompson on Electricity, Deschanel 
on Optics and Acoustics. Laboratory Guides: Stew- 
art & (ice, Glazebrook & Shaw, Kohlrauseh. Ref- 
erences: Ganot, Silliinan, Deschanel, Maxwell, 
Jenkin, ( tordon. 



I 

Agriculture \m> Mechanic Arts. 51 



Political Economy. — F. A. Walker, Mill, Gregory, Wayland — 
Chapin, Perry, Newcomb, Roschre. 

Practical Agriculture. — Lectures, Emerson and Flint's Man- 
ual. 

Principles of M echanism. — Goodeve. 

PSYCHOLOGY. — Lectures. References. — Hamilton's Lectures on 
Metaphysics. Cousin's Modern Philosophy. Way- 
land's Intellectual Philosophy. Morell's History 
of Modern Philosophy. Mind. (A Quarterly Re- 
view.) Stewart's Philosophical Works. Lotze's 
Microcosnios. 

Railroad Surveying. — Searles. 

Resistance of Materials.— Wood. 

Retaining Walls.— Tate, Jacob, Allen. 

Rhetoric— Lectures, Hill. 

Hoof and Bridge Structures.— Shreve, Waddle. 

sanitary Engineering. — Philbrick, Latham. 

Steam Engine.— Rankine. 

Stereotomy. — Church. 

Stock Breeding and Feeding. — Lectures. 

Surveying. — Davies. 

Thermodynamics.— Du Bois. 

Trigonometry.— Wheeler. 

In the Veterinary Course.— 

Anatomy. — Chauveau, Strangeway, Percivall. 
Botany.— Bessey, Gray. 

Chemistry. — Attfield, Gamgee's Physiological Chemistry. 
Cattle Practice.— Hill, Steele, Clater, Dobson. 
1 ) extistr y. —Clark. 

Equine Medicine.— Williams, Greswell, Robertson. 
Helminthology. — Cobbold. 
Histology.— Klein. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — Finlay, Dun, Bar- 

tholow, Wood, 
Ringer, Morton, 



52 



Iowa State College of 



Obstetrics. — Fleming. 

Pathology (General).— Green, Wagner, Shakespeare. 
Pathology (Surgical). — Fleming, Billroth. 
Physiology. --Foster, Dalton, Landois, Flint. 
Sanitary Science and Police.— Fleming. 
Surgery.— Williams, Fleming, Liautard. 

Zoology.— Packard. 

Zoology. — Freshman Year. — (Second Term. ) — Orton. 

Zoology. — Sophomore Year. — (Second Term) — Referen< ks: 
Packard's Zoology, Brooks' Hand-book of Invertebrate 
Zoology. 

Zoology. — Junior Year. — (First Term.) — References: Pack- 
ard's Zoology. Parker's Zootomy. 




Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 53 



Remarks on the General Course in the Sci- 
ences Related to the Industries, 



In the Freshman and Sophomore years this course is clearly 
defined, and but few elective studies are offered. 

In the Junior and Senior years, however, the student is per- 
mitted to select for each term a number of studies aggregating not 
less than fifteen nor more than eighteen exercises per week. No 
study, however, can be selected unless the studies necessarily an- 
tecedent to it have been passed. Selections must be made before 
the expiration of the second day of the term, and once made can- 
not be changed. 

Any member of the Junior or Senior class who is a can- 
didate for the degree of B. Sc, and who desires to pursue work 
in any general branch of study to a greater extent than is 
outlined in the general course, can do so if his written application 
for the same receives the endorsement of the professor in charge 
of the given study or department, and of the President, and provid- 
ed it will not cause any conflict in the hours of recitation. The 
amount of time given to such study as decided by the professor in 
charge will be counted as a part of the whole amount of work 
required. In selecting such additional work the other studies 
making up the required number of exercises shall embrace the 
subjects most closely related to it, and this special study allowed 
shall not exceed one-third of the term's work. 

Mathematics, (professors stanton, hainer, mount, 

AND MRS. RILEY.) 

[For text-books used see pages 48 to r>2. | 
Algebra.— In algebra there are two divisions. The first Of 
these is composed of students who show by their entrance exam- 
inations thoroughness in arithmetic and a ready familiarity with 
the principles of algebra through equations of the first degree ; 
the second includes all students obtaining a high standing in 
arithmetic, and passing the required examination in algebra, but 



54 Iowa State College of 



showing in this latter study a want of thoroughness. Particular 
attention is given in this study to the explanation of the cardinal 
principles, and the drill in the solution of problems and equations 
is conducted with reference to fixing these principles in the mind 
of the student. 

Geometry. — All students who complete algebra and secure a 
standing of three (four being perfect) in either of the divisions in 
algebra are permitted to enter the class in geometry. This class 
is divided into two divisions, corresponding with those in alge- 
bra. # The student is early taught the full meaning of a geometrical 
demonstration. He is warned against learning any proposition 
by rote ; and in order that he may not fall into this error, he is, at 
the end of the first book, assigned original theorems, which he is 
required to demonstrate. He is expected not only to understand 
thoroughly each proposition, but to be able so to arrange and pre- 
sent the points of proof as to form a complete and perfect demon- 
stration. 

Trigonometry.— Instruction is given in this branch during 
the first nine weeks of the Sophomore year. The class is thor- 
oughly drilled in the nature and use of trigonometrical functions. 

Analytical Geometry.— This study is pursued by the 
Sophomore class during the second term. The course of instruc- 
tion embraces determinate and indeterminate geometry, includ- 
ing a full examination of the conic sections. The underlying 
principles are brought prominently forward and discussed. The 
student is required carefully to analyze each article, and solve the 
problem connected therewith. To secure thoroughness frequent 
reviews are given. 

Calculus. —Instruction in calculus is given during the 
spring term of the .Junior year. To enter thisclass it is necessary 
that the student should have passed the lower mathematical 
studies of the course. In no case can this study be pursued suc- 
cessfully without previous drill in analytical geometry. The 
abstruse principles of this method of mathematical investigation 
are explained upon the theory of rates, rather than upon the the- 
ory of infinitesimals. Instruction is given by daily recitations 
and lectures with a review of the week's work each Friday. 
Twelve weeks are devoted to differential, and the remainder of 
t he term to integral calculus. 

U" r ~s<>c Bemarka in black-faced type, page 3JJ. 



Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 55 

Physics, (professor hainer.) 

[For text-books used see pages 18 to 52.] 

The study of Physics begins with the Sophomore year 

and extends through the Junior year. The following is an out- 
line of the course of study : In the first term of the Sophomore 
year the main topics are : composition and resolution of force ; 
the elementary machines ; laws of motion ; composition and res- 
olution of motion ; friction ; work ; kinetic and potential energy ; 
center of gravity ; specific gravity; elasticity; hydrostatics and 
pneumatics. 

In the second term of the Sophomore year: thermometry ; 
principles of the measurement of heat ; specific and latent heat; 
mutual relations of heat and work ; transference of heat ; 
sources of heat ; hygrometry ; magnets ; properties of the 
magnetic field ; the potential ; principles of magnetic measure- 
ments ; sources of electricity ; galvanic batteries ; Ohm's law and 
its application to simple and divided circuits. 

In the first term of the Junior year the main topics are : 
chemical and heating effects of currents; relation between elec- 
tricity and magnetism; induced currents; principles and instru- 
ments of electrical measurements; the nature and propagation of 
sound; the laws of the vibration of sounding bodies; reflection 
and refraction of light; properties of mirrors and lenses; optical 
instruments; spectrum analysis; radiant heat; polarization and 
the physical nature of light. 

In the second term of the Junior year the study is pursued by 
practical work in the Physical Laboratory. One afternoon is 
given to this work per week. 

This embraces the course of study in general physics. The 
subject is taught by lectures, text-books and recitations. Experi- 
mental demonstrations are given of the important laws and prin- 
ciples; and, so far as the knowledge of the student will permit, 
the pratical applications of physical laws in the industries will 
be indicated. 

To students who desire it, and who are properly qualified, an 
opportunity is given to take extra work in physics. The follow- 
ing is an outline of the work offered : In the second term of the 
Junioryear, a course of lectures in analytical mechanics especially 
adapted to further the study of advanced physics; methods of 
physical investigations and the reduction of observations, includ- 



56 Iowa State College of 



ing the method of "least squares." Laboratory work two after- 
noons per week is required. 

During the Senior year the study is continued in the fol- 
lowing lines: Theory of heat, (Maxwell); theory of electricity, 
(Gumming); undulatory theory of optics, (Airy), and dynamo-elec- 
tric machinery, (Thompson). The student continues laboratory 
work throughout the year using as a guide "Physical Measure- 
ments" by Kohlrausch. 

The Physical Cabinet is well supplied with apparatus both 
for experimental demonstration, and for exact measurements in 
laboratory work. 

Chemistry — (professor bennett). 

[For text books used see pages 48 to 52]. 

Instruction in inorganic chemistry begins with the Sophomore 
year and is required in all the courses. During the first half of 
the year three recitations and lectures per week are devoted to 
descriptive and theoretical chemistry. The laboratory practice, 
six hours per week, is intended to illustrate the principles studied 
in the class-room, each student being required to perform all the 
necessary experimentation. In order better to train the student's 
powers of observation he is required to describe the apparatus 
used and the phenomena observed and to trace the relation of the 
results to the principles which underlie them. In the second half 
of the year, the same general plan is pursued in the recitations 
and lectures with the addition of practice in solving problems, 
writing reactions, and the study of the principles of qualitative 
analysis. The laboratory work, six hours per week, is devoted to 
qualitative analysis, consisting of a study of solubility the ex- 
amination of known material, and a separation of unknown mix- 
tures. This term's work is required in the agricultural, and in 
the general course. 

Quantitative analysis in the first half of the .Junior year con- 
sists of density, gravimetric and volumetric determinations and 
separations, using first pure chemicals and afterwards impure sub- 
stances. The laboratory work occupies six hours per week. In 
addition to recitation upon the principles and methods of quanti- 
tative analysis the student makes an elementary study of oxida- 
i ion and reduction 

The study of organic chemistry in the second half of the 
Junior year is experimental and theoretical,, Using Itemsen's Or- 



Agricultubi \m> Mechanic Arts. 57 



ganic Chemistry as text-book and laboratory guide. There are 
three recitations and three hours per week of laboratory practice. 

Agricultural chemistry in the first half of the Senior year 
consists of an elementary study of soils, manures, plants, milk, and 
kindred substances. The work of the Junior year and of the first 
half of the Senior year is required in the agricultural course and 
elective in the general course. 

The study of organic chemistry in the second half of the 
Senior year consists of qualitative and quantitative analysis of 
organic compounds, comprising a study of known materials and 
followed by analysis of unknown organic mixtures. The text- 
book is I'rescott's Proximate Organic Analysis. This is a "four 
hour" elective in the general course, open to students who have 
taken all of their above prescribed and elective work in chem- 
istry, and in the order in which it is here laid down. 

The students in the Veterinary course study chemistry for one 
year. The work is introduced by an elementary study of general 
chemistry, followed by a short course in qualitative analysis. 
Urine analysis and toxicology occupy the remainder of the year. 
Chemical and microscopical examinations of urine are made in 
both its normal and abnormal conditions. The common organic 
and inorganic poisons are studied in connection with the exami- 
nation of foods and tissues in assumed cases of poisoning. 

The laboratory furnishes room for one hundred students 
working at one time, and is supplied with gas and water at each 
table. Ample facilities are ottered for all the work described. 

The work ottered in chemistry is sufficiently extended to 
furnish the student a good foundation for further study and re- 
search, either as an original investigator or as a practical chemist. 
The work is recommended as much for its educational value as 
for its practical utility. Students in chemistry are charged simply 
the actual cost of the chemicals and other materials used or de- 
stroyed in the prosecution of their work. 

Biology (PROFESSORS HALSTEI), OSBORN, PAIKCHILD AND 
STALKER). 

Botany— (professor halsted). 

[For list of text-books used see pages 48 to 52. 

The study of botany begins in the second term of the Fresh- 
man year. The ground covered is that embraced in Gray's First 
Lessons. In connection with this text-book each student makes 



58 Iowa State College of 



drawings and descriptions of roots, stems and leaves collected by 
himself. This is followed by a thorough study of the flower. The 
terms used in descriptive botany are dwelt upon, and all mem- 
bers of the class become familiar with the methods of determin- 
ing the botanical names of plants. Each student is required to 
do some field work for every lesson, either in bringing specimens 
to the class room, or submitting a written report of observations 
made. 

In the first term of the Sophomore year the students study 
plants systematically and learn to recognize readily the most im- 
portant natural orders. A herbarium of fifty species of flower- 
ing plants, named and neatly mounted, is required of each mem- 
ber of the class. In addition to this work in systematic botany, 
a course of recitations in advanced structural botany, using Vol. 
I of Gray's Botanical Text-book, is pursued by the class. 

The study of vegetable anatomy and physiology is begun 
in the second term of the Sophomore year. The students 
work three hours per week in the botanical laboratory, and with 
the compound microscope examine the minute structure of the 
roots, stems, leaves, flowers and seeds of various plants. The ac- 
companying class room exercises consist of recitations upon, and 
elaborations of, the work pursued in the laboratory. Each student 
continues his systematic field work and adds fifty species of flow- 
ering plants to his herbarium. 

In the first term of the Junior year students continue their 
microscopic study of plants. The work for the term is divided 
between vegetable physiology and a study of cryptogamic botany 
— ferns, mosses, etc. Special attention is given to the various kinds 
of parasitic fungi including rusts, smuts, mildews, molds, etc., 
so destructive to crops. Each student adds thirty species of flow- 
erless plants to his herbarium of previous terms. 

In the second term of the .Junior year students in the Agri- 
cultural Course study the plants of the farm and garden. Special 
attention is paid to the origination of varieties through cross-fer- 
tilization and other means; the accumulation of new character- 
istics in plants; adaptation to conditions, and similar practical 
problems in applied botany. 

The Seniors in the Veterinary Course during the first term 
puisne a course of crvptogamic botany, including a systematic 
study of the flowering plants injurious to domestic animals. A 
large part of the work consists of microscopic study of rusts, 



A«.i:n i in re am> Mechanic Arts. 59 



smuts, moulds, ami ergot, from a pathological standpoint. The 
subject of bacteria receives its merited share of attention. 

During the second term of the Senior year the Agricultural 
student^ receive instruction in the diseases of cultivated plants 
and become familiar with the life history of the leading destruc- 
tive fungi. The best remedies are pointed out and experiments 
with fungicides are made by the class. 

The Seniors in the Engineering Course in their first term 
study the microscopical structure of various woods. 

Students in the General Course specially interested in botany 
may continue their studies in that branch through the Junior and 
Senior years. The facilities for such special work are ample. The 
laboratory is well equipped with apparatus for the anatomical in- 
vestigation of plants, and the herbarium, including all groups of 
plants, furnishes means for excellent advance work in systematic 
botany. Candidates for the second degree have abundant facili- 
ties for the pursuit of special lines of investigation in the various 
branches of botanical science. 

Zoology— (professor OS BORN). 
[For text-books used see pages 48 to 52]. 

In the second term of the Freshman year students take up the 
study of general zoology by examining and making drawings of 
animals common in the locality. This work is supplemented in 
the class room by lectures and recitations on the general struc- 
ture, relations, habits and distribution of animals. 

The first term of the Sophomore year is devoted to the subject 
of general and economic entomology, embracing lectures and dis- 
cussions upon insects, with particular attention to injurious and 
beneficial species. The students make dissections and drawings 
of representative species, and a given number are collected and 
classified. No text-book is used. 

With the second term of this year the student begins the 
advanced study of comparative zoology by means of dissections 
and microscopical study in the laboratory, along with lectures and 
class exercises. This term is occupied with invertebrate animals. 

The first term of the Junior year is devoted to a similar study 
of the vertebrates. 

Brooks' Hand-book of Invertebrate Zoology, and Parker's 
Zootomy are used as aids in the laboratory, while the class 
work and lectures embrace the ground covered in Packard's 
Zoology. 



60 Iowa State College of 



The Junior students in the Veterinary course pursue the study 
of Vertebrate Zoology in class room and laboratory during the first 
term of the year, and in the second term two exercises per week 
are devoted to lectures and laboratory work upon the parasites 
of Domestic animals. 

The Seniors in the Agricultural course may devote two exer- 
cises per week to the study of insects injurious to the orchard, 
farm crops and domestic animals. 

The Zoological Laboratory is supplied with twenty-four micro- 
scopes (Beck's economic and Histological dissecting), a sliding 
microtome and other apparatus for microscopical study and gross 
dissections. A supply of marine animals, properly preserved for 
laboratory work, has been secured so that a thorough study may 
be made of certain groups otherwise inaccessible to inland stu- 
dents. 

The Zoological Museum includes mounted specimens of a 
number of mammals; several hundred birds, representing the 
avian fauna of the State; a large collection of reptiles and batra- 
chians in alcohol; a collection of Pacific Coast fishes, donated by 
the U. S. Fish Commission; a few native fishes, and a small but 
typical collection of lower invertebrates with a set of glass models 
representing delicate marine forms. A set of Ward casts illustrat- 
ing the principal fossils is of service in this study as well as in 
geology. 

The collection of insects embraces a large series of native spe- 
cies, in many instances all stages in the life history of an insect 
being represented. Special care has been taken to secure the 
species of economic interest. There are also collections of the nests 
and eggs of birds, and of skulls, skeletons and brains of verte- 
brates. These collections are constantly receiving additions. The 
museum rooms, as well as the laboratory, are open to students for 
the direct study of specimens. Visitors are admitted to the muse- 
um every afternoon from one to five o'clock. 

Opportunities are allowed for pursuing advanced or special 
lines of study in /oology and entomology during the Junior and 
Senior years, and also during the post graduate course. 

Physiology, (professors fairchild and stalker.) 

[For text books lined seo pages 48 to r >2. | 

In the second term of the Junior year the study of compara- 
tive and human anatomy and physiology is taken up in a course 
of lectures and text-boob exercises throughout the term. The gen- 



A«. rh i i 1 1 i;i \mi Mechanic Arts. 61 



eral and special facts of biology and the anatomical structures of 
the various organisms arc described with as much minuteness of 
detail as the time will admit, followed by a resume of the subject, 
in which the evolution of the different systems of organs is traced 
from their earliest beginning to their most differentiated forms. 
The course is introduced by lectures on comparative embryology. 
By combining the different biological studies of the general 
course with certain studies of the Veterinary School it will be seen 
that a student can devote two years almost exclusively to biologi- 
cal work. Those who desire to spend only a limited time, and 
who are not candidates for degress, may, if properly prepared, 
select entirely from studies in these branches. The selections 
possible are as follows: First term: botany, zoology and entomol- 
ogy. Second term: histology, botany, physiology and zoology or 
embryology. Third term: botany, histology, physiology, anat- 
omy or paleontology. Fourth term: zoology, pathology, compar- 
ative and human anatomy, and botany. 

Geology. ( professor osrorn. ) 

[For text-books used see pages 48 to 52.] 
Students of the Senior class pursue this subject during the first 
term. A portion of the time is taken up with lectures; a review 
of the geology of Iowa; and a study of typical fossils, while the 
quarries in the vicinity are visited by the students to examine the 
strata and secure specimens. In the Geological Museum students 
have access to a good collection of common rocks, minerals and 
fossils, as well as to the series of Ward casts. 

Astronomy, (professor hainer.) 

[For text books used see pages 48 to 52.] 
During the second term of the Junior year three exercises per 
week are devoted to astronomy. The principal topics studied are 
astronomical instruments; planetary motions; eclipses; chronol- 
ogy ; structure of the solar system ; constellations ; nebulae ; mo- 
tions and distances of stars; cosmogony. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

(THE PRESIDENT AND PROFESSORS WELCH AND STANTON.) 

Psychology, (professor welch.) 
[For list of books of reference see pages 48 to 52.] 
Psychology, which presents an analysis of the intellectual 
powers, supplies two distinct wants : 



62 Iowa State College of 



First; giving to the student an insight into his own mental 
processes, it enables him to think, with greater accuracy and 
clearness, on the various subjects that thereafter engage his at- 
tention; and since success in all the lines of human activity de- 
pends on genuine thinking, psychology is one of the most prac- 
tical of studies. 

Secondly; especially as taught here, it elucidates fully the 
fundamental principles and mutual relations of the industrial 
sciences comprised in the various courses of study. Thus, for ex- 
ample, while botany and zoology arrange the useful plants and 
and animals into classes, psychology discloses to the student the 
underlying principles of association which render such classifi- 
cation possible. While chemistry analyzes the fertilizers and the 
products whose growth they hasten, psychology reveals the 
methods of reasoning on which such analyses proceed. More- 
over, the incipient unit in each science, the processes of experi- 
mentation, discovery and mathematical research, by which it ad- 
vances, are all brought to light in the study of psychology. 

Finally; it is by the study of psychology, that we are enabled 
to classify the industrial sciences into closely related groups, thus 
showing that no student can become eminent in any one, with- 
out studying the entire group to which it belongs. 

It is, then, apparent that the student can scarcely reach the 
final breadth and depth of science, without gaining from psychol- 
ogy, the ultimate principles of reasoning and classification on 
which it is based. 

Psychology occupies the Senior class, in the lecture room, rive 
hours a week, during the first term of the year. It is taught by 
daily lectures and the students make original investigations in 
the library, according to a syllabus prepared by the professor. In 
the course of the term, each member writes Ave essays on different 
psychological topics. Psychology is a necessary antecedent to 
such branches as ethics, logic and history of civilization. 

History of Civilization, (proffssor welch). 
[For books of reference see pages 48 to 52.] 
The study of those forces which promote civilization, occu- 
pies Ave hours a week in the lecture room during the second term 
of 1 Ik- Senior year. One of the main objects sought in this study, 
is to gain a clear knowledge of the origin and progress up to the 
present lime, of the practical sciences, arts and industries previ- 
ously studied and practiced in the different industrial depart- 



A., ru i i 1 1 in \\i> Mi<n\M( Aims. 63 



ments of the college. In this way it will be seen that the study 
of the History of Civilization is in full harmony with the indus- 
trial courses and that the student can hardly attain the complete 
mastery of his specialty until he knows its history as one of the 
civilizing forces. 

The attempt is also made to give a clear, yet concise, history 
of the origin and growth of government, religion, science, lan- 
guage, education, industry and mechanic arts; in short, to 
scrutinize rapidly the forces, both natural and supernatural, by 
means of which the primitive savage was, as the centuries 
passed, metamorphosed into the civilized man. 

The daily exercises consist of a lecture of twenty minutes on 
the methods of investigating each of the subjects mentioned, and 
the remainder of the hour is occupied in hearing written reports 
from members of the class appointed to pursue, in the library, 
special lines of research. In this work each member selects a 
topic in the history of the civilizing forces, which embraces the 
matter most nearly related to his future vocation. 

By the above method, it is believed, the habit of independent 
investigation is formed. As to the actual knowledge acquired, 
nothing further can be attempted than to lay well the founda- 
tion for future acquirements in a branch of learning which every 
genuine student will subsequently pursue. 

Ethics— ( PRESIDENT CHAMBERLAIN). 

[For text-books and works of reference see pages 48 to 52]. 

Ten weeks of the last term of the Senior year are devoted to 
a study of the ground work of moral science. This study follows 
psychology or mental science in the course, because it must rest 
fundamentally upon it. Hickok's Moral Science, revised by Presi- 
dent Seelye, is used as the principal text-book (1886) because on 
the whole it seems to present the correct theory of moral obliga- 
tion. The text-book is supplemented by lectures, the main object 
of the whole being to impress upon the mind of the student the 
belief that man has a moral nature; that this world is, for man, 
a moral world, created and ruled by a Moral Being for moral ends. 
That, in no narrow sense, "honesty is the best policy;" that is, 
right conduct morally is the wisest settled principle of action. 
That our spiritual environment favors right conduct. That there 
is "a Power not ourselves that makes for righteousness," and that 
it is, in the highest sense, wise to work with, and not against, that 



64 Iowa State College of 



Power. And, finally, that the Christian Scriptures, apprehended 
by our reason, are on the whole our best means of learning what 
is the mind and will of that Power. Principles are sought; mere 
questions of casuistry are avoided. 

Political Economy — (professor stanton). 

[For text-books used see pages 48 to 52]. 

In this division of social science are taught, by text-books, 
familiar lectures and discussions, the laws of labor — its products 
and their costs; the principles of capital, money, foreign trade, 
tariff, taxation, and all the influences that quicken or retard ex- 
change. The student thus gains a thorough acquaintance with 
the scientific data that underlie and regulate industry, and be- 
comes familiar with the principles that should determine all ques- 
tions of public policy concerning which there is so wide a divers- 
ity of opinion. 

COMMERCIAL LAW. 

It is the aim in this study to present the general principles of 
law relating to ordinary business transactions. Contracts, agency, 
partnership, sale of goods, commercial paper, and real estate, are 
studied. The changes in the common law, made by the statutes 
of the State, are set forth by means of lectures. Particular at- 
tention is given to the forms of notes, bills, drafts, checks, etc., 
and by frequent reviews and examinations the student is made 
familiar with the requisites of the more common business papers. 

LITERATURE, LANGUAGE AND HISTORY. 

English Composition and Applied Rhetoric— (professor welch, 

MISS BLOOD AND OTHERS). 

[For text-books used sec pages 48 to 52]. 

Instruction in Knglish Composition is given during the first 
term (half) of the Freshman year. The correct expression of 
thought through written language is taught, and enforced by fre- 
quent exercises. A clear knowledge of the grammatical structure 
of the Knglish sentence is sought. A thorough knowledge of 
spelling, punctuation and the proper use of capitals is presup- 
posed, but if found to be lacking on the part of any, special extra 
drill is given, and work required. 

In the second term (bait) of the Freshman year the time of 
three recitations each week is devoted to a series of exercises in 



A.ORici i.nivK and Mechanic Arris. 65 



applied rhetoric, in which the design is to familiarize the mind 

with those details of composition and expression, which are most 
in requisition in practical life, and are usually most neglected; 
going no further in the philosophy of this branch than these prac- 
tical ends will indicate and permit. The attempt is to teach the 
pupil to express his thoughts clearly and forcibly by means of 
written language. 

Two Dissertations are required of each student, one during 
the second term of the .Junior year, and one during the first term of 
the Senior year. At the beginning of the proper term the student 
is required to select any general study in science or literature al- 
ready pursued by him, as the general subject of his dissertation, 
and announce such choice at once, for approval, to the President 
of the College, and to the Professor under whom he pursued the 
study thus selected. The Professor will then, 011 consultation 
with the student, assign to him some special topic or line of special 
investigation, and will criticise and approve the general plan and 
method of his work during its progress. On the completion, by 
the student, of his dissertation (which must be at least four weeks 
before the close of the term) he will read it to the same Professor 
for final criticism and marking. The marks shall have the weight 
of those on three \v r eeks' recitation in determining the general 
term's standing of the student. A neat, final, ink copy must be 
made by the student, on paper of uniform size and style designat- 
ed by the College, to be bound with other dissertations, and pre- 
served in the College Library. The length of each dissertation is 
required to be from 20 to 35 minutes. 

While the main object of the dissertations is to encourage 
special investigation, they also give an excellent drill in English 
Composition. 

English Literature— (p ho fkssok wynn). 

The first term (half) of the Junior year is devoted to Eng- 
lish Literature proper, five hours per week. It is found best in 
this limited time, after glancing at the sources of the English 
language and literature, to detain the class on the Anglo-Norman 
period, as the seed-plat for all the lines of literary effort in subse- 
quent times, — History, Romance, Ballad poetry and the Drama. A 
similar pause is made at the Elizabethan Era for the direct study 
of the great masterpieces of that creative epoch, laying special 
stress on Shakespeare's plays. Dr. Hudson's Annotated Classics 



66 Iowa State College of 



are used as hand-books in the study of Shakespeare. Incidentally 
Tennyson's Idyls of the King are studied as illustrating the 
Arthurian Legends. The student is required to furnish the re- 
sults of his study in a form to be inspected finally in addition to 
his stated examinations. 

Literary Criticism, (professor wynn.) 

This study is pursued by the Seniors during the closing six 
weeks of the last term of their course, rive days a week. As ulti- 
mately the principles of Literary Criticism are to be found con- 
sistently developed in the general subject of .Esthetics, some 
brief system of ^Esthetics (Lotze's or Hegel's) is put into the 
hands of the student, and together with the required work on 
this, there are lectures delivered, the design of which is to apply 
directly the principles to noted examples of the literary art furn- 
ished to hand. 

History, (professor wynn. J 

Ancient History is taught to the gentlemen the first term of 
the Freshman year of the General Course, rive days a week, as 
an optional study, and to the ladies as a required study also in 
(lie second term of the Sophomore year, two days a week in the 
Ladies 1 Course. Modern History is also taught to the ladies in 
t he first term of their Sophomore year, two days a week. Fisher's 
Outlines of Universal History is put into the hands of the stu- 
dents of all classes for free use and reference in and out of class, 
the aim being, in so far as the curriculum will allow, to carry out 
the "Seminar Method" in the study of this important branch. 
Salient features of the times under review are assigned for re- 
search and dismission tocertain members of the class, the whole 
subject being thrown open to remarks and inquiries from any 
one. The ground traversed is then carefully reviewed, and 
examinations follow. 

Latin, (professor wvnn.) 

Latin is optional in the General Course with the English 
Language and Composition, and in the Ladies' Course with 
French, hi both Courses it is desirable to assume sufficient prep- 
aration before entering to take up Caesar at once. During the 
first term of the Freshman year two books of Csesar are read and 
two books of Virgil's iEneid, and the drill is thorough upon Latin 
forms and syntax. During the second term tin; remaining four 



Agriculture \m> Mechanic Arts. 67 



books of the first six of the .Eneid are completed. During the 
first term of the Sophomore year, a few of Cicero's Orations are 
read. The second term is occupied with Livy. The Latin is nec- 
essarily studied in this College chiefly as a means of learning 
the principles of language, and as the hest known means of learn- 
ing the etymology of English words, and the principles of Eng- 
lish syntax. Incidentally too it is a valuable aid in learning the 
nomenclature of the scientific studies pursued here. The attempt 
is to teach it in the way best adapted to promote these ends. 
In the view of Trustees and Faculty, the object of the College, 
as set forth in the law of Congress making the land grants that 
form the munificent endowments of this and similar State col- 
leges, does not require that extended study of the Latin lan- 
guage and literature which may be desirable in colleges founded 
in another way and for a somewhat different purpose. Such 
knowledge is acquired as shall be valuable in itself for the pur- 
poses named, and as shall tit the pupil for further study by him- 
self should occasion require. The Greek language is not taught. 

German and French, (professor stockmann.) 

German is taught in the first term of the Freshman year, La- 
dies' Course, the grammar being illustrated and practically ap- 
plied through the natural method and by original work. In the 
second term, instruction in the etymology, syntax, idioms and 
pronunciation of the language is given by means of conversation 
and exercises in writing. In the first term of the Sophomore 
year German literature is taught by reading, conversation and 
one lecture per week. At the end of this term the student has 
gained facility in conversing in German. In the second term of 
the Sophomore year of the Ladies' Course, students translate 
into German from the works of standard English authors, and 
have two lectures per week on comparative literature. In the 
first term of the Junior year of the Ladies' Course the history of 
German literature and art is taught by reading, conversation and 
two illustrated lectures per week. En the Junior year this study 
is optional in the gentlemen's courses. 

French.— French, open to students in the various courses, 
is taught by the same methods as those outlined above for the 
study of the German language. 

Military Science and Tactics, (professor Lincoln, i 
It is not intended to complete the education of the thorough 
soldier, but to fit young men for filling intelligently positions in 



68 Iowa State College of 



the State troops as line officers and company instructors. The 
constant demand for men thus trained emphasizes the value of a 
thoroughly organized and well sustained military course. The 
chief advantages derived are the acquirement of a dignified car- 
riage of the person, a gentlemanly deportment and a self-respect- 
ing discipline, with habits of neatness, order and punctuality. 
Opportunities are afforded each cadet for extending the studies in 
military science as desired, the College being provided with the 
necessary arms, accoutrements and outfits for drill and instruction 
in the infantry, artillery and signal tactics, for which special 
classes will be formed. Lectures on military subjects are deliv- 
ered throughout the course, and regular battalion drill and dress 
parade take place each Wednesday afternoon. All male students 
of the college, except such as may be excused by proper authority, 
are required to become members of the college battalion, and wear 
the prescribed uniform during military exercises. 
Elocution, (preceptress blood.) 
Instruction in elocution is given in all the courses. The sys- 
tem of voice culture is based upon the discoveries of modern scien- 
tists and removes all impurities from the voice, giving fullness, 
flexibility and power. A thorough physicial training is involved 
in this course, resulting in improved health as well as grace and 
ease of manner. The laws underlying the art of expression are 
taught, so that the pupil becomes the master of principles and 
rules, not a mere imitator of a certain model. The philosophy of 
expression taught is that discovered by Delsarte in gesture, and 
that adaptation of the system to voice and rendering begun by 
Professor Lewis B. Monroe, and developed by C. W. Emerson, M. 
I)., principal of the Monroe Conservatory of Oratory, Boston, Mass. 

Vocal and Instrumental Music, and Painting, (miss gaff and 

MISS GOWDY.) 

The above branches are not taught by law in the College cur- 
riculum. Opportunities are afforded, however, to such as desire 
it to take lessons upon the organ, the piano, in vocal training and 
in painting. 

Tin: Piano Porte. — In the study of this instrument particu- 
lar attention is given to technique as a necessary foundation for a 
perfect mastering of the piano forte. The works use are techni- 
cal studies of a high character and the compositions of the besl 
writers. 

The Pipe Organ. — The methods of George Whiting of the 
N«-w England Conservatory of Music, Boston, arc followed as far 



A.GRIC1 LTURE AND MECHANIC A ins. f>9 



as possible, and the Works of Kirk, Mendelssohn, Guilmant, 
Whiting and others are used. No pupils arc advised to take up 
the study of the Pipe Organ until somewhat advanced in piano 
forte playing. Charges per term of twenty lessons upon the piano 
or organ ten dollars. For use of piano two hours daily practice 
fifty cents per month. For use of piano one hour daily practice 
twenty-five cents per month. No pupils arc taken for less than a 
full term, and no deduction will be made for temporary absence 
from lessons. 

Vocal Music— Instruction in vocal music is given in private 

lessons and to a choral class. Voices are trained with the utmost 
care, and fitted for the concert room if desired. The choral exer- 
cises are most effective in rendering works which train and 
strengthen the voice, and elevate the musical taste. Charges per 
term of twenty half hour lessons, ten dollars. Choral class two 
lessons per week for four months, four dollars. 

Painting.— A convenient studio, containing some choice 
studies, from the ancient and the modern masters, has been fitted 
up for the pupils in painting. Charges per term of twelve lessons 
ten dollars. Materials can be obtained at the College. 

The Library, (mrs. riley, librarian.) 

The library numbers about eight thousand volumes. These 
have been selected with reference to the wants of the departments, 
the aim being to build up a w r orking library, which shall furnish 
the students, who are pursuing investigations beyond the ordinary 
text-books, with the best authorities and works of reference. It is 
not the intention of the College to furnish in its library a means 
of amusement, and while its officers hope to see the students use 
the books freely, they expect that such use shall be in all cases 
with a definite object in view. As the student's stay in college is 
short, and his time consequently of the greatest value, he cannot 
afford to waste it in the desultory reading even of good books. It is 
therefore urged upon students that they lay out for themselves 
courses of reading and study in the library, under the advise of 
the Librarian, or of some of the professors. It is urged further that 
students make frequent use of the books of reference recommended 
by the teachers of the various college studies. The library is open 
from 7 A. m. to 9 a. m., from i! P. m. to 5 p. m., and from 7 p. m. 
to 9 p. M. 



To Iowa State College of 



ThB C our be for LadiEs, 



This course is much the same as the general course for gentle- 
men, except that more time is devoted to language and literature 
and less to pure and applied science. A careful examination of 
the arrangement of studies, (see tabulated arrangement, pages 
46-47), will show that a lady may pursue a language study through- 
out the course and combine with it any two of the five named 
sciences. A lady student, for example, may take two years of 
Latin and two years of German, or two and a half years of either 
Latin or German and a year and a half of French. In addition 
to the other literary studies and domestic economy the lady stu- 
dent takes botany one year and has the choice of any two of the 
following sciences, viz: mathematics, physics, chemistry, zoology 
and vegetable physiology. Opportunities are given, to such as 
desire it, to take lessons in music and painting, and the very best 
instruction is provided in both these branches. Other courses, 
especially the General Course in Science, are also open to ladies. 

tin Sec page :i!L bottom ; also |>as?<» 81, notices. 



Agriculture and Mechanic Ak 



Tim CouPse in EgrinulturB, 



The course is designed to meet the wants of such pupils as de- 
sire an extended course in the sciences which underlie agriculture, 
with special reference to their practical application in the diver- 
sified industries of the farm. Particular attention is paid to the 
problem of economical production, and to the reduction of farm 
improvement and management to a science which shall elemi- 
nate, as far as practicable, elements of uncertainty, and teach well 
defined principles of success. The course has been framed to com- 
bine that knowledge and skill which will best prepare the pupil for 
the highest demands of agricultural industry. The distinctive 
work of the course is divided into the two departments — Agricul- 
ture and Horticulture. 

Agriculture, (professor knap? and the president.) 

In the first term, Freshman year, Stock Breeding is taught, 
two lessons per week. These lessons begin with lectures on the 
Breeds of Live Stock, their valuable points and fields of useful- 
ness. For the laws of breeding, a text-book is used together with 
such notes as are needed to round up the work according to the 
recent developments of the times. Lectures are also given on 
managing and judging stock, which are illustrated by the large 
variety of grade and thoroughbred stock on the College Farm. 

In the second term instruction in the dairy is given two days 
per week, during which the following topics are discussed in a 
practical way : Essential points of the dairy cow; the best breeds 
and crosses; food and management; milk, its constituents, and its 
value for food; practical dairying and the manufacture of butter 
and cheese by the most approved methods. To illustrate and 
demonstrate the various problems, there is upon the farm a dairy 
of seventy cows, composed of pure Short-horns, Holsteins and 
Jerseys, and grades of the same breeds. The dairy barn is ample 
for eighty cows, and with facilities for storing food and making 



72 Iowa State College of 



experiments upon a corresponding scale. The creamery is a sub- 
stantial structure, with a full supply of improved apparatus. 

The auxiliary studies pursued during the Freshman year are 
algebra, geometry, rhetoric, botany, zoology, history, drawing and 
composition. 

During the Sophomore year the supporting studies, botany, 
chemistry, zoology, physics and higher mathematics are pursued. 

During the second term Practical Agriculture is taught two 
lessons per week. The text-book used is Emmerson and Flint's 
Manual of Agriculture, with lectures and notes on crops, rotation, 
tillage, drainage, farm management, etc. 

It is believed that few institutions possess so complete facil- 
ities for illustration in this department as can be found in the 
thoroughly systematic division of improved stock, horses, cattle, 
sheep and swine upon the college farm. 

In the Junior year, agricultural botany is taught, with partic- 
lar reference to our peculiar soil and climate. During the year 
the relating studies, physics, vegetable physiology, landscape 
gardening and farm engineering, are pursued; also the following 
general branches: English literature, political economy and com- 
mercial law. 

The special studies pursued in the Senior year are experimen- 
tal agriculture, agricultural chemistry, veterinary science, and 
lectures on food, which cover a domain of knowledge of great 
practical value. They enable the student to understand soils, 
cereals, grasses, fertilizers, improved machinery and methods of 
cultivation, and the anatomy, physiology and food of domestic 
animals. 

Horticulture and Forestry.— (professor budd.) 

These studies form a part of the Course in Agriculture. 
Singly and alone the time allotted to this technical line of study 
and practice could accomplish little more than to make the stu- 
dent familiar with some of the leading modes and methods of em- 
pirical gardening, considered mainly as a mere art. Supported, 
however, by the full course in natural sciences, the routine of 
horticultural operations rises above the level of unreasoning cus- 
tom to the rank of applied science. The cultivated plant becomes 
a thing of life, varied in vitality, habit of growth, and fruitfulness 
by conditions of soil and air more or less under control. 

The studies begin with the second term of the Freshman year. 
No lext books are used in this or the Sophomore year, as in the 



A.GRICTJLTUR] \M> MECHANIC ART8. 



consideration of the subjects of small-fruit growing, orcharding, 
lawn-planting, flower-border, and forestry, we have no text hook 
as vet adapted to our prairie soil and climate. Instruction is im- 
parted by lectures, making every possible use of the many in- 
structive object lessons of the grounds, the nurseries, the orchards 
and the horticultural museum. 

The supporting studies in botany, chemistry, entomology, 
agriculture, etc., fit the class during the first and second terms of 
the Junior year for the intelligent consideration of theoretical 
horticulture as outlined in "Lindley's Theory of Horticulture," 
enabling the student to comprehend important principles pertain- 
ing to vital force, germination, root and stem growth, leaf form- 
at ion and functions, climatic adaptation, etc., intimately associated 
in our State with failure or varied degrees of success in all horti- 
cultural operations. 

MEANS OK PRACTICAL ILLUSTRATION. 

1. The vegetable gardens. 

2. The flower borders. 

3. The ornamental grounds. 

4. The experimental nurseries. 

5. The experimental orchards. 
*;. The small fruit plantations. 

7. The forestry plantations. 

8. The propagating rooms. 

9. The propagating pits under glass. 

10. The collection of native and cultivated woods. 

11. The collection of injurious and beneficial insects. 

12. The set of abnormal and diseased growths. 
1:5. A set of fac-simile fruit casts. 

14. The horticultural museum, now accumulating. 

LAHOR. 

To illustrate each branch, and enable the student to become 
familiar with methods and processes, and acquire some skill, he 
is expected to engage in such labor as will best promote a knowl- 
edge of the particular study in hand, from one to two hours each 
day according to the work assigned. 

IF2?~See pas^e 33, bottom : also page Si, Notices. 



74 Iowa State College of 



ThE CoursE in MEchanicEl 
EnginEEring 



The object of the course of study and practice in this depart- 
ment (of which Professor Bassett is Dean, or Professor specially in 
charge) is to impart a thorough knowledge of the application of 
mathematics, drawing, and the use of tools to the designing, man- 
ufacture and operation of machinery. In addition to the tech- 
nical instruction given, the course also provides the means of 
obtaining a liberal education. 

In the Freshman year the studies pursued are much the same 
as in the course in the Sciences Related to the Industries. Free- 
hand Drawing, however, is given four hours per week and is of a 
character adapted to engineering work. 

In the Sophomore year plane trigonometry, land surveying, 
physics, chemistry, principles of mchanism, and descriptive 
geometry constitute the leading studies. Mechanical drawing is 
continued through the second term and consists of a progress- 
ive series of studies and exercises in shading, shadows and pro- 
jections. 

The study of principles of mechanism and of kinematics is 
finished the first nine weeks of the Junior year, after which the 
study of the resistance of materials and of analytical mechanics 
occupies five recitations per week throughout the remainder of 
the year. Thermodynamics is given three recitations per week 
through the second term. Lectures and experimental work are 
added as the class advances in the different subjects. The time 
set apart for drawing during this year is almost wholly occupied 
in making working drawings, showing elevation, plan and sec- 
tional views of parts of various machines ased in the work-shops. 

[n the Senior year "Rankine's Steam Engine" is used as a 
text-book for the first term, lectures on the steam engine and 
other prime movers being given as the class progresses. Work- 
ing drawings of an original design for an automatic cut-off steam 
engine are begun at the commencement of this term. Instruc- 
tion for I be second term consists of lectures on mechanical engin- 
eering subjects, and a series of tests of the steam engine and boiler 



A.GRICULTURE A M I MECHANIC A NTs. 75 



used in the work-shops. In addition to the completion of the 
drawings of the steam engine, begun in the first term, each stu- 
dent is required to make a finished thesis drawing. 

The professor in charge will select such drawings as he shall 
desire from the set madety the students in this course, to become 
the property of the department; or he may require any student 
to make one or more drawings especially for the department. 

The machine and carpenter shops of the department are 
equipped with steam power, machinery, benches and small tools 
suitable for the practical work of the course. 

These shops are conducted on the plan of a manufacturing 
establishment, first class workmen among the students being 
employed in the construction of machinery and wood work to 
be used by the College or sold in the market. Students enter the 
shops as workmen and are taught to make things that are to be 
used, rather than those designed to suit a theoretical view of 
mechanical training. 

The products of the shops are selected with particular refer- 
ence to their value as a means of instruction in the principles 
involved in the use of tools and in the construction of machinery, 
a> well as for their money value when completed. 

Students are required to work in the shops ten hours per 
week throughout the course, and are under the instruction of 
a skilled foreman. 



The CaursE in Civil Engineering, 



This course (of which Professor Mount is Dean, or Professor 
specially in charge) is similar to that in mechanical engineering and 
also, though in a less degree, to the general course, as will be 
noticed upon examination of the several courses of study. 

The Freshman year and the first term of the Sophomore year 
are devoted mainly to preliminary studies including algebra, geo- 
metry, trigonometry, land surveying, drawing and language. In 
the second term Sophomore year the principal studies are analy- 
tical geometry, descriptive geometry, railroad surveying, (with 



7G Iowa State College of 



field practice) and physics. In connection with the class work 
in descriptive geometry a series of drawing problems comprising 
some twenty plates, is prepared by each student. 

In the first term Junior year students have calculus, a contin- 
uation of descriptive geometry, and railroad surveying. As in 
the previous term, the preparation of drawings and practice in 
the field constitute a leading feature of the work. 

In the second term Junior year students have analytical 
mechanics, and the survey and location of a short line of railroad, 
including the complete mapping of the same. 

During the Senior year the study of bridges forms an import- 
ant feature of the work. A bridge, including working drawings 
of all details, is designed during the second term by each student. 
Such other subjects as retaining walls, specifications and con- 
tracts, etc., are also studied during this year. 

In all studies taught, it is the object to give practical as well 
as theoretical knowledge, and for this purpose a large amount of 
draughting and field work is required of each student. The 
department is well supplied with field instruments, drawings, 
blue prints, models, draughting tables, etc., many of which are 
the work of its own students. 



TJie Course in IlElErinaru Scieiice, 



It is the purpose of this course or department (of which Dr. 
Stalker is Dean, or Professor specially in charge, and Professor 
Kairchild is a principal special instructor and lecturer), to train 
students for practice in veterinary medicine. The anatomy of the 
horse is the special object of study, but important structural dif- 
ferences of other domestic animals are carefully noted. The 
lectures on anatomy are illustrated by means of plates, models, 
skeletons and prepared specimens of the organs A convenient 
and well-furnished dissecting room affords the students every 
facility for anatomical work. 

Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. — In the first term 

of the Junior year there are two recitations per week in zoology 
dealing exclusively with invertebrates. During this time the stu- 
dent spends one afternoon each week in the laboratory in the dis- 
IVSee page :;:{. bottom; also page si. notices. 



A.GRICULTURE AND MECHANIC A.ETS. 77 



section of typical tonus. In the second term there are four 
recitations or lectures per week upon general comparative anat- 
omy. 

Histology and Physiology. — This embraces systematic 
histology, which is taught by lectures throughout the second term 
of the Junior year, and practical histology, including the micro- 
Bcopic study of the tissues of the animal body. The various 
methods of preparing tissues for microscopic examination are 
taught with the object of familiarizing the eye of the student with 
the minute anatomy of the tissues of the anamal body. 

Physiology is taught in the first term of the Senior year by 
lectures, recitations and demonstrations. Physiology is carried 
along with microscopical anatomy. Labratory facilities are 
offered to students who desire to engage in original work. 

Pathology. — Pathological specimens of all kinds are brought 
before the class for the purpose of familiarizing the student with 
the appearance of diseased tissues. The relations of pathological 
histology to the principles of medicine and surgery are carefully 
studied, and the advances made in the application of the micro- 
scope to exact pathology fully considered. The use of the micro- 
scope in the study of pathological specimens forms an important 
part of the laboratory work during the last term of the Senior 
year. 

Botany. — This branch extends through one year's time. In 
the first term of his Junior year the student acquaints himself 
with general botany, and gives some attention to the identifica- 
tion of plants. In the spring term of his Senior year the student 
takes up medical botany. He is taught the natural system of 
classification and the characteristics of the natural orders which 
contain the poisonous plants. He is also made familiar with bac- 
teria and the germ theory of disease. 

Chemistry.— The elementary chemistry is the same as that 
given in the first term of the Sophomore year of the General 
Course. In the Senior year the work includes the detection of 
poison; analysis of urine from healthy and diseased animals, 
examinations of food, and of water; qualitative and quan- 
titative analysis of the secretions in, and excretions from, the 
body, together with such work as the clinical department may 
require. Students also compound or make medicines required by 
the department. During the second term original work is 
required. 



78 Iowa State Collge of 



Therapeutics. — The physiological action and therapeutical 
value of medicines used in veterinary practice are carefully con- 
sidered throughout the Senior year. 

Veterinary Medicine and Surgery. — These subjects em- 
brace theoretical and practical instruction in the treatment of dis- 
eases to which all domestic animals are subject, as well as the 
theory and practice of surgery. Members of the Senior class are 
made familiar with the uses of instruments and the administra- 
tion of medicines. 

Clinics. — One hour each day is devoted to clinics. The Sen- 
iors are required to examine animals for certificates of soundness, 
diagnose diseases and prescribe for the same. 

This Department is really a College of Veterinary Medicine 
and Surgery, and has the fullest equipments for thorough instruc- 
tion and practice. The course of study leads to the degree of Doc- 
tor of Veterinary Medicine, (D. V. M ) 



The Course in Domestic Economy, 



This Course or School (of which Mrs. Ewing is Dean, or Pro- 
fessor specially in charge) is based upon the assumption (hat no 
industry is more important to human happiness than that which 
belps to make home, and that a pleasant home is an essential ele- 
ment of broad culture, and one of the surest safeguards of morality 
and virtue. It was organized to meet the wants of pupils who 
desire a knowledge of the principles that underlie domestic econ- 
omy, and the course of study is especially arranged to furnish 
women instruction in applied housekeeping and the arts and 
sciences relating thereto; to incite them to a faithful performance 
of the every-day duties of life, and to inspire them with a belief in 
the nobleness and dignity of a true womanhood. 

No calling requires for its perfect mastery more of practice and 
theory combined, than that of domestic economy, and students in 
addition to recitations and lectures on the various topics of the 
course, receive practical training in all branches of housework, in 



Agriculture \m» Mechanic Arts. 79 



the purchase and care of family supplies, and in general household 
management. They are not, however, required to perform a 
greater amount of labor than is necessary for the desired instruc- 
tion. 

The course of study is designed lor graduates of colleges and 
universities. It extends through two years, and leads to the de- 
gree of Master of Domestic Economy. 

All students in the Ladies' Course are required to take a cer- 
tain part of the Course in Domestic Economy, asset forth in the 
schedule for the Ladies' Course. 



General and Special Remarks. 



SPECIAL LINES OF STUDY. 

Any person of mature age and good moral character, who de- 
sires to pursue studies in any department of instruction of the col- 
lege, and who is not a candidate for a degree, will, upon applica- 
tion to the President, be admitted on the following conditions: 
(1.) He must meet the requirements for admission to the Fresh- 
man class and pass such special examinations as the Professor in 
charge of the department selected shall deem essential to a profi- 
table pursuit of the work. (2.) He shall confine his work strictly 
to the line of study chosen at the time of admission, and shall 
take enough of class work and of laboratory and other practice to 
be equivalent to the amount of work required of the regularly 
classified student. (3 ) He shall submit to the same requirements 
in daily recitations and in examinations, with students in the reg- 
ular courses. Such students will be permitted to room and board 
in the dormitories of the college if the regularly classified students 
do not occupy all the rooms. 

Students who have successfully pursued thus a special line of 
study in the Institution, but not such as to entitle them to gradu- 
ation, will, upon application to the Faculty, be granted the Col- 
lege Certificate showing their standings in such studies. 

See also page 61, near the top, for one such line of study. 



SO Iowa State College of 



HIGHER DEGREES. 

Such degrees are conferred upon candidates recommended by 
the Faculty, in conformity with the following rules : 

1. The degree of Master of Science (M. Sc.) is open to Bachel- 
ors of Science who are graduates of the course in the Sciences Re- 
lated to the Industries, and before 1881, of the course in the 
Sciences related to Agriculture, and of the Ladies Course of this 
College. 

2. The degree of Master of Scientific Agriculture ( M. S. A. i is 
open to Bachelors of Scientific Agriculture. 

3. The degree of Mechanical Engineer (M. E.) is open to 
Bachelors of Mechanical Engineering, and to Bachelors of Science 
before 1878, who are graduates of the Mechanical Engineering 
Course of this College. 

4. The degree of Civil Engineer (C. E.) is open to Bachelors of 
Civil Engineering, and to Bachelors of Science before 1S78, who 
are graduates of the Civil Engineering Course of this College. 

5. The degree of Master of Philosophy (M. Ph.) is open to 
graduates of any of the four-year courses of study in this College. 

The Faculty will recommend for the above degrees candi- 
dates otherwise qualified who, after taking their Bachelor's degree, 
shall pursue a two years course of study embracing at least two 
subjects selected with the approval of the Faculty from the list of 
post-graduate studies, and shall, during that time, reside at the 
College for at least one year ; and shall pass a thorough examina- 
tion upon that course, showing in one of the subjects special attain- 
ments, and shall present a satisfactory thesis. 

Each resident graduate must apply in writing for examina- 
tion at least six weeks before the annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees, stating explicitly the subject in which he desires to be 
examined, and, at the time of examination, (which may be four 
weeks before the meeting of the Board,) he must present to the 
Faculty his final thesis. 

1 >( )ST-( ; RA I ) 1 1 AT K ST U D I FS. 

instruction and opportunities for study are given in the fol- 
lowing branches to post-graduate students : 

1. Psychology. 2. The Philosophy of science. 3. Social sci- 
ence. 4. The English literature of the Elizabethan period. 6. The 
Science of language. 6. Physiological botany. 7. Systematic 
botany. 8. Special zoology. 9. Original designs of engineering 



Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. SI 



structures, 10. Veterinary pathology and materia medica. 11. 
The principles of heredity. 12. Applied mechanics. 13. Agricul- 
tural and organic chemistry. 14. Advanced physics. 15. Analy- 
tical geometry and calculus. 16. Horticulture and forestry. 17. 
Agriculture. 18. French, German and Latin. 

Senior Theses for Graduation.— It should have been stated in 
its proper place in the Catalogue that the final thesis of each 
Senior must be completed and submitted to the Faculty four 
weeks before Commencement day ; and that the plan in regard to 
selection of subject, consultation, and preparation of thesis, is sim- 
ilar to that for dissertations, explained on page 65. See also 
bottom of page 38. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

NOTICE. 

The College has no Preparatory Department. The require- 
ments for admission to the Freshman class in the several courses 
of study are placed so low that the graded schools of the state can 
tit pupils for admission. In the view of Trustees and Faculty this 
College ought not to duplicate the work thus done by the public 
school system of the state. See also note at the bottom of page 33. 
The College cannot hold itself responsible for the disappointment 
of those who, as is often the case, present themselves for examina- 
tion without having ascertained or attempted to comply with the 
requirements of admission. See page 33 for requirements. 
EXAMINATIONS, SPECIAL NOTICE. 

Examinations for promotion from each college class to the 
next higher in the course occur only during the last full iveek of 
the Fall term and the first week of the Spring term each year. 
Students who teach school during the winter wiil be expected so 
to arrange the time of beginning and of closing their schools as to 
be present at one of these regular examinations. Students who 
do not teach will of course be expected to be present. Sickness 
and actual inability will be held to be the only valid excuses for 
absence. See also the note at the bottom of page 33. Special or 
private examinations cannot be held to suit the convenience, 
merely, of students. To hold them thus would be a damage to all 
the classes and an injustice to the Faculty. The same general 
regulations hold good in regard to the examinations at the close 
of the Spring term in June and at the beginning of the Fall term 
in July. The success of the College, and of each student in it, de- 
pends upon the rigid enforcement of the above regulations. 



82 Index. 



INDEX. 



Admission, Requirements for .____.. 33-34 

Agriculture, Course in 41, and 71-78 

Algebra, ----- - 53 

Anatomy, ---------- 71; 

Astronomy, ---------- 6] 

Biology, - --------- 57-61 

Board of Trustees, Meetings, etc., - - 6 

Board, (Table) Cost of, per week, ----- 35 

Botany. ----------- 57-59 

Buildings. College -------- 30-32 

Calculus, ----- ... . . . 54 

Calendar, College -------- 5 

Card of Inquiry, - - - - 34 

Certificate of Standing, College - 7!) 

Chemistry, ---------- 56-57 

Civilization, History of ------- 62-63 

Classification of Students, ------- 85 

Clinics, - - - 78 

Commercial Law, - ------- 64 

Courses of Study, Tabular Exhibit of ... - 88-44 

Courses of Study, General Remarks on - 58-81 

Creamery, College ___.-- 81 

Criticism, Literary ... - 66 

Degrees in the College Courses, - - ... 8S 

Degrees, Higher, or Post-Graduate - - ... so 

Directions to Candidates and Students, - - - 88-34 

Dissertations, - - - - - - - 65 

Domestic Economy, Course in - - 44, and 78-79 

Elocution, - - - 68 

English Composition, - 64 65 

Equipments, Buildings, etc., ----- 30-32 

Ethics, - - . . . - <>:; 64 



Index. S3 



PAGES. 

Examinations, - 35 and 81 

Expenses Necessary, of Student, - - - 35-36 

Faculty of the College, -.--"-. 7-8 

French, -------- 67 

Genera] Courses of Study, etc., Tabular Exhibit, - 30 

General Courses of Study, etc., Remarks on - - 53-69 

Geology, - - - - - - - 61 

Geometry, ------- 54 

German, ------- 67 

Government, ------- 37 

Graduates, Complete List of - 18-27 

Graduates, Resident, List of ----- 9 

(J rounds, College ------ 32 

Histology, ------- 77 

Historical Sketch of Origin of College, - - - 28-30 

History, General ------ 60 

History of Civilization, ----- 62-68 

Horticulture, ------- 71-72 

Labor, Instructive and Uninstructiye - - - 36-37 

Laboratory and Shop Practice, - 36-37 

Ladies' Course of Study, - 40 and 70 

Language and Literature, - 64-66 

Latin, Objects Sought in its Study, - - - 66-67 

Library, College ------ 69 

Location of College, - 30 

Manual Training, Shop Practice, etc., - - - 36-37 

Mathematics, --_... 53 .-,4 

Mechanical Engineering, Courses in - 42, and 74-7o 

Medicine and Surgery, Veterinary - 78 

Meetings of Board of Trustees, - 6 

Military Science, ------ 67-68 

Moral Science, ---.__ 63-64 

Music, Vocal and Instrumental - 68-69 

Officers of the Board of Trustees, - 6 

Officers of Instruction, ----- 7-8 

Painting, ------- 69 

Pathology, ------- 77 

Philosophy. ------- 61-64 

Physics, ------- 55_56 

Physiology, ------- 60-61 

Political Economy, - 64 



84 Indkx 



PAGES. 

Post-Graduate Studies, - 80-81 

Post-Graduate Students, List of ... 9 

Preparatory Department, Reason why there is none, - 81 

Psychology, - - - - - - - 61-02 

Public Worship, - - - 37-38 

Recitations, Time Table of - 40-47 

Resident Graduates, ------ 9 

Rhetoric, ------- G4-G5 

Shop Practice and Laboratory Work, - - - 36-37 

Shop Practice and Laboratory Work, Time Table of - 45 

Special Remarks and Notices, - - 33, 35 and 79-81 

Special Studies or Lines of Study, - - 53 and 79 

Students, List or Catalogue of - 9-17 

Summary of Students in Attendance, - 17 

Text Books used, List of 48-52 

Therapeutics, ------- 78 

Theses, Graduation - - 38 and 81 

Theses, Post-Graduate ----- 80 

Time Table of Laboratory Work and Shop Practice, 4/j 

Time Table of Recitations, ----- 40-47 

Trigonometry, ------ ,-)4 

Trustees, Meetings, Officers, &c, - - 

Veterinary Science, Course in - - 44, and 70-78 

Worship, Public - - - 37-38 

Zoology, ------- 59 00 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



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